Evaluating edge-of-range genetic patterns for tropical echinoderms, Acanthaster planci and Tripneustes gratilla, of the Kermadec Islands, southwest Pacific

Liggins, Libby, Gleeson, Lachlan and Riginos, Cynthia (2014) Evaluating edge-of-range genetic patterns for tropical echinoderms, Acanthaster planci and Tripneustes gratilla, of the Kermadec Islands, southwest Pacific. Bulletin of Marine Science, 90 1: 379-397. doi:10.5343/bms.2013.1015

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Author Liggins, Libby
Gleeson, Lachlan
Riginos, Cynthia
Title Evaluating edge-of-range genetic patterns for tropical echinoderms, Acanthaster planci and Tripneustes gratilla, of the Kermadec Islands, southwest Pacific
Formatted title
Evaluating edge-of-range genetic patterns for tropical echinoderms, Acanthaster planci and Tripneustes gratilla, of the Kermadec Islands, southwest Pacific
Journal name Bulletin of Marine Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0007-4977
1553-6955
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.5343/bms.2013.1015
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 90
Issue 1
Start page 379
End page 397
Total pages 19
Place of publication Miami, FL, United States
Publisher Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Edge-of-range populations are often typified by patterns of low genetic diversity and high genetic differentiation relative to populations within the core of a species range. The “core-periphery hypothesis,” also known as the “central-marginal hypothesis,” predicts that these genetic patterns at the edge-of-range are a consequence of reduced population size and connectivity toward a species range periphery. It is unclear, however, how these expectations relate to high dispersal marine species that can conceivably maintain high abundance and high connectivity at their range edge. In the present study, we characterize the genetic patterns of two tropical echinoderm populations in the Kermadec Islands, the edge of their southwest Pacific range, and compare these genetic patterns to those from populations throughout their east Indian and Pacific ranges. We find that the populations of both Acanthaster planci (Linnaeus, 1758) and Tripneustes gratilla (Linnaeus, 1758) are represented by a single haplotype at the Kermadec Islands (based on mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase C subunit I). Such low genetic diversity concurs with the expectations of the “core-periphery hypothesis.” Furthermore, the haplotypic composition of both populations suggests they have been founded by a small number of colonists with little subsequent immigration. Thus, local reproduction and self-recruitment appear to maintain these populations despite the ecologically marginal conditions of the Kermadec Islands for these tropical species. Understanding rates of self-recruitment vs reliance on connectivity with populations outside of the Kermadec Islands has implications for the persistence of these populations and range stability of these echinoderm species.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 3 December 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 13 Feb 2014, 17:39:44 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences