The wisdom of letting go and performance: the moderating role of emotional intelligence and discrete emotions

Janaki, Gooty, Gavin, Mark B., Ashkanasy, Neal M. and Thomas, Jane S. (2014) The wisdom of letting go and performance: the moderating role of emotional intelligence and discrete emotions. Journal of Occupational And Organizational Psychology, 87 2: 392-413. doi:10.1111/joop.12053

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Author Janaki, Gooty
Gavin, Mark B.
Ashkanasy, Neal M.
Thomas, Jane S.
Title The wisdom of letting go and performance: the moderating role of emotional intelligence and discrete emotions
Journal name Journal of Occupational And Organizational Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0963-1798
2044-8325
Publication date 2014-01-29
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/joop.12053
Volume 87
Issue 2
Start page 392
End page 413
Total pages 22
Place of publication Chichester, West Sussex, United Kingdom
Publisher John Wiley & Sons
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Drawing upon cognitive appraisal theory and affective events theory, we develop and test a model of discrete emotions, coping, and performance that contains both within- and between-person components. We argue that when employees feel angry, guilty, joyous, or proud at work, those with higher levels of ability-based emotional intelligence will turn to emotion-focused coping as a means to deal with the immediate aftermath of the emotion. This form of coping requires the least amount of cognitive resources and facilitates performance by helping individuals to meet their task demands. Random coefficient modelling findings from daily diary data collected in a law enforcement setting support our proposed ideas concerning the interactive effects of emotions and emotional intelligence on coping, as well as the effects of coping on task performance.

Practitioner points
• The findings from this study conducted in a law enforcement setting suggest that coping strategies such as venting, denial, and disengagement might be adaptive for short-term performance.
• Organizations could manage employee emotions via awareness of appropriate coping responses and selecting higher ABEI individuals for jobs that involve emotions on a routine basis.
Keyword Emotions
Ability-based emotional intelligence
Coping
Performance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article first published online : 29 JAN 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 12 Feb 2014, 22:26:41 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School