Control and responsibility in addicted individuals: what do addiction neuroscientists and clinicians think?

Carter, Adrian, Mathews, Rebecca, Bell, Stephanie, Lucke, Jayne and Hall, Wayne (2013) Control and responsibility in addicted individuals: what do addiction neuroscientists and clinicians think?. Neuroethics, Online First 2: 1-10. doi:10.1007/s12152-013-9196-6

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Author Carter, Adrian
Mathews, Rebecca
Bell, Stephanie
Lucke, Jayne
Hall, Wayne
Title Control and responsibility in addicted individuals: what do addiction neuroscientists and clinicians think?
Journal name Neuroethics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1874-5490
1874-5504
Publication date 2013-10-06
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12152-013-9196-6
Volume Online First
Issue 2
Start page 1
End page 10
Total pages 10
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer Netherlands
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Impaired control over drug use is a defining characteristic of addiction in the major diagnostic systems. However there is significant debate about the extent of this impairment. This qualitative study examines the extent to which leading Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians believe that addicted individuals have control over their drug use and are responsible for their behaviour. One hour semi-structured interviews were conducted during 2009 and 2010 with 31 Australian addiction neuroscientists and clinicians (10 females and 21 males; 16 with clinical experience and 15 with no clinical experience). Although many addiction neuroscientists and clinicians described uncontrolled or compulsive drug use as characteristic of addiction, most were ambivalent about whether or not addicted people could be said to have no control of their drug use. Most believed that addicted individuals have fluctuating levels of impaired control over their drug use but they nonetheless believed that addicted persons were responsible for their behaviour, including criminal behaviour engaged in to fund their drug use. Addiction was not seen as exculpating criminal behaviour but as a mitigating factor.
Keyword Addiction
Drug use
Control
Responsibility
Compulsion
Attitudes
Qualitative research
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 06 October 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 12 Feb 2014, 00:17:48 EST by Roheen Gill on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research