Obesity bias among health and non-health students attending an Australian university and their perceived obesity education

Robinson, Emma L., Ball, Lauren E. and Leveritt, Michael D. (2014) Obesity bias among health and non-health students attending an Australian university and their perceived obesity education. Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior, 46 5: 390-395. doi:10.1016/j.jneb.2013.12.003

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Robinson, Emma L.
Ball, Lauren E.
Leveritt, Michael D.
Title Obesity bias among health and non-health students attending an Australian university and their perceived obesity education
Journal name Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1499-4046
1878-2620
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jneb.2013.12.003
Open Access Status
Volume 46
Issue 5
Start page 390
End page 395
Total pages 6
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective This study compared the level of prejudice against obese individuals (obesity bias) among final-year health and non-health students, and associated obesity education.

Methods Cross-sectional online survey of 479 final-year students (292 health and 187 non-health) from Griffith University, Australia. Implicit and explicit obesity bias was measured using validated tools, and perceived obesity education ranked from “none” to “excellent.” Data were analyzed quantitatively using analysis of variance and independent sample t tests. Statistical significance was set at P < .05.

Results Students' mean age was 26.2 ± 7.6 years and body mass index was 23.2 ± 4.7 kg/m2. Health and non-health students exhibited significant levels of obesity bias. Non-health students were more likely to suggest that obese individuals lacked willpower (P = .03). Students' self-reported obesity education varied considerably. Those who reported a higher level of genetics-related obesity education were less likely to believe that obese individuals were “bad” (P = .002) or to show concern about putting on weight (P = .01).

Conclusions and Implications Obesity bias exists in health students in Australia and is similar to non-health students' obesity bias levels. Students' self-reported genetics-related obesity education may be associated with obesity bias. Modifications to existing health curricula should be considered to reduce obesity bias among future health professionals.
Keyword Obesity
Prejudice
Education
University
Health
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Fri, 07 Feb 2014, 21:47:38 EST by Michael Leveritt on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences