Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?

Gullo, Matthew J., St. John, Nathan, Young, Ross McD., Saunders, John B., Noble, Ernest P. and Connor, Jason P. (2014) Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?. Addictive Behaviors, In Press, Accepted Manuscript 11: 1-33. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.004

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Author Gullo, Matthew J.
St. John, Nathan
Young, Ross McD.
Saunders, John B.
Noble, Ernest P.
Connor, Jason P.
Title Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?
Journal name Addictive Behaviors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Publication date 2014-02-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.004
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume In Press, Accepted Manuscript
Issue 11
Start page 1
End page 33
Total pages 33
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• Perceived impaired control is a key cognitive construct in alcohol misuse
• It mediates risk conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent samples
• Present study found, in alcohol-dependent drinkers, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity and dependence severity
• However, this pathway of risk mechanism was not moderated by the DRD2 polymorphism or verbal fluency.

Perceived impaired control over alcohol use is a key cognitive construct in alcohol dependence that has been related prospectively to treatment outcome and may mediate risk for problem drinking conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent drinkers. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether perceived impaired control may mediate the association between impulsivity-related measures (derived from the Short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised) and alcohol-dependence severity in alcohol-dependent drinkers. Furthermore, the extent to which this hypothesized relationship was moderated by genetic risk (Taq1A polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene cluster) and verbal fluency as an indicator of executive cognitive ability (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) was also examined. A sample of 143 alcohol-dependent inpatients provided an extensive clinical history of their alcohol use, gave 10 milliliters of blood for DNA analysis, and completed self-report measures relating to impulsivity, impaired control and severity of dependence. As hypothesized, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity-related measures and alcohol-dependence severity. This relationship was not moderated by the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism or verbal fluency. These results suggest that, in alcohol dependence, perceived impaired control is a cognitive mediator of impulsivity-related constructs that may be unaffected by DRD2/ANKK1 and neurocognitive processes underlying the retrieval of verbal information.
Keyword Impulsivity
Impulsive cognition
Impaired control
DRD2/ANKK1
Alcohol dependence
Cognitive dysfunction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID APP1036365
APP997551
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 15 February 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 05 Feb 2014, 10:35:07 EST by Matthew Gullo on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse