Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?

Gullo, Matthew J., St. John, Nathan, Young, Ross McD., Saunders, John B., Noble, Ernest P. and Connor, Jason P. (2014) Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?. Addictive Behaviors, In Press, Accepted Manuscript 11: 1-33. doi:10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.004

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Gulloetal2014AD.pdf Full text Preprint (open access) application/pdf 472.87KB 0

Author Gullo, Matthew J.
St. John, Nathan
Young, Ross McD.
Saunders, John B.
Noble, Ernest P.
Connor, Jason P.
Title Impulsivity-related cognition in alcohol dependence: is it moderated by DRD2/ANKK1 gene status and executive dysfunction?
Journal name Addictive Behaviors   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4603
1873-6327
Publication date 2014-02-15
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.addbeh.2014.02.004
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume In Press, Accepted Manuscript
Issue 11
Start page 1
End page 33
Total pages 33
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Subject 2701 Medicine (miscellaneous)
3203 Clinical Psychology
3005 Toxicology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Perceived impaired control over alcohol use is a key cognitive construct in alcohol dependence that has been related prospectively to treatment outcome and may mediate the risk for problem drinking conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent drinkers. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether perceived impaired control may mediate the association between impulsivity-related measures (derived from the Short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire Revised) and alcohol-dependence severity in alcohol-dependent drinkers. Furthermore, the extent to which this hypothesized relationship was moderated by genetic risk (Taq1A polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene cluster) and verbal fluency as an indicator of executive cognitive ability (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) was also examined. A sample of 143 alcohol-dependent inpatients provided an extensive clinical history of their alcohol use, gave 10 ml of blood for DNA analysis, and completed self-report measures relating to impulsivity, impaired control and severity of dependence. As hypothesized, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity-related measures and alcohol-dependence severity. This relationship was not moderated by the DRD2/ANICK1 polymorphism or verbal fluency. These results suggest that, in alcohol dependence, perceived impaired control is a cognitive mediator of impulsivity-related constructs that may be unaffected by DRD2/ANKK1 and neurocognitive processes underlying the retrieval of verbal information. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• Perceived impaired control is a key cognitive construct in alcohol misuse
• It mediates risk conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent samples
• Present study found, in alcohol-dependent drinkers, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity and dependence severity
• However, this pathway of risk mechanism was not moderated by the DRD2 polymorphism or verbal fluency.

Perceived impaired control over alcohol use is a key cognitive construct in alcohol dependence that has been related prospectively to treatment outcome and may mediate risk for problem drinking conveyed by impulsivity in non-dependent drinkers. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether perceived impaired control may mediate the association between impulsivity-related measures (derived from the Short-form Eysenck Personality Questionnaire-Revised) and alcohol-dependence severity in alcohol-dependent drinkers. Furthermore, the extent to which this hypothesized relationship was moderated by genetic risk (Taq1A polymorphism in the DRD2/ANKK1 gene cluster) and verbal fluency as an indicator of executive cognitive ability (Controlled Oral Word Association Test) was also examined. A sample of 143 alcohol-dependent inpatients provided an extensive clinical history of their alcohol use, gave 10 milliliters of blood for DNA analysis, and completed self-report measures relating to impulsivity, impaired control and severity of dependence. As hypothesized, perceived impaired control (partially) mediated the association between impulsivity-related measures and alcohol-dependence severity. This relationship was not moderated by the DRD2/ANKK1 polymorphism or verbal fluency. These results suggest that, in alcohol dependence, perceived impaired control is a cognitive mediator of impulsivity-related constructs that may be unaffected by DRD2/ANKK1 and neurocognitive processes underlying the retrieval of verbal information.
Keyword Impulsivity
Impulsive cognition
Impaired control
DRD2/ANKK1
Alcohol dependence
Cognitive dysfunction
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID APP1036365
APP997551
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 15 February 2014

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 4 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 4 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 05 Feb 2014, 10:35:07 EST by Matthew Gullo on behalf of Centre for Youth Substance Abuse