Compounded progesterone and the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use

Spark, M. Joy, Willis, Jon and Iacono, Teresa (2014) Compounded progesterone and the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use. Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy, 10 4: 693-699. doi:10.1016/j.sapharm.2013.08.001


Author Spark, M. Joy
Willis, Jon
Iacono, Teresa
Title Compounded progesterone and the Behavioral Model of Health Services Use
Journal name Research in Social and Administrative Pharmacy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1551-7411
1934-8150
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.sapharm.2013.08.001
Volume 10
Issue 4
Start page 693
End page 699
Total pages 7
Place of publication Philadelphia, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Compounded progesterone (P4) is a product that, from a clinical experience-based perspective, effectively relieves a range of symptoms. In contrast, from a conventional evidence-based medicine perspective, P4 is ineffective. As P4 is not a product prescribed by conventional medicine, it is unlikely to be prescribed by family doctors, which increases the barriers to utilization.

Utilization of medicines is influenced by many contextual and individual characteristics. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use provides a multidimensional framework to conceptualize utilization of health services including medicine use. The 4 main components of this model are: contextual characteristics, individual characteristics, health behaviors and outcomes.

This paper reports on the application of The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use to medicines and shows how it can be applied to the use of P4. The model enables some of the positive reinforcement that contributes to women continuing to use P4 to be explained. The Behavioral Model of Health Services Use was found to offer the potential to identify and then address issues with access to prescription medicines.
Keyword Progesterone
Medicine use
Behavioural model
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print 20 September 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Wed, 05 Feb 2014, 03:14:31 EST by Jon Willis on behalf of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies Unit