Functional implications of ontogenetically and sexually dimorphic dentition in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata

Gutteridge, Adrian N. and Bennett, Michael B. (2014) Functional implications of ontogenetically and sexually dimorphic dentition in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata. Journal of Experimental Biology, 217 2: 192-200. doi:10.1242/jeb.089326

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Author Gutteridge, Adrian N.
Bennett, Michael B.
Title Functional implications of ontogenetically and sexually dimorphic dentition in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata
Formatted title
Functional implications of ontogenetically and sexually dimorphic dentition in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata
Journal name Journal of Experimental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1477-9145
0022-0949
Publication date 2014-01-15
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1242/jeb.089326
Open Access Status File (Publisher version)
Volume 217
Issue 2
Start page 192
End page 200
Total pages 9
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher The Company of Biologists
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Unlike other elasmobranchs, batoids exhibit sexually dimorphic dentition. The functional implications of such dentition, however, remain understudied. For the present study, ontogenetic and sexual dimorphism in tooth and jaw structure, together with the functional implications of this dimorphism, were determined in the eastern shovelnose ray, Aptychotrema rostrata. Sexually dimorphic dentition and jaw structure was first observed in sub-adult age classes, with males developing a pronounced lower jaw at the symphysis. Monognathic heterodonty was prominent in mature males, with teeth in the symphyseal region developing significantly greater heights and sharpness ratios in comparison to females. Ex vivo mechanical grip strength tests were used to determine simulated bite-grip tenacity. The mean peak pull-out forces required to withdraw a section of a dissected pectoral fin from between jaws closed with a constant occlusal force was highest for mature males, intermediate for mature females and lowest for immature females and males. Although the species exhibits ontogenetic variations in diet, these were unrelated to sex. Rather, the larger and highly cuspidate teeth of mature males increased the bite-grip tenacity, which likely aids in copulation.
Keyword Bite
Morphology
Jaw
Replacement
Teeth
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First posted online September 26, 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 03 Feb 2014, 18:44:54 EST by Assoc Prof Mike Bennett on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences