Association between gestational weight gain and postpartum diabetes: evidence from a community based large cohort study

Al Mamun, Abdullah, Mannan, Munim, O'Callaghan, Michael J., Williams, Gail M., Najman, Jake M. and Callaway, Leonie K. (2013) Association between gestational weight gain and postpartum diabetes: evidence from a community based large cohort study. PloS One, 8 12: . doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075679


Author Al Mamun, Abdullah
Mannan, Munim
O'Callaghan, Michael J.
Williams, Gail M.
Najman, Jake M.
Callaway, Leonie K.
Title Association between gestational weight gain and postpartum diabetes: evidence from a community based large cohort study
Journal name PloS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-12-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0075679
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 12
Total pages 9
Place of publication San Francisco, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Abstract We have investigated the prospective association between excess gestational weight gain (GWG) and development of diabetes by 21 years post-partum using a community-based large prospective cohort study in Brisbane, Australia. There were 3386 mothers for whom complete data were available on GWG, pre-pregnancy BMI and self-reported diabetes 21 years post-partum. We used The Institute of Medicine (IOM) definition to categorize GWG as inadequate, adequate and excessive. We found 839 (25.78%) mothers gained inadequate weight, 1,353 (39.96%) had adequate weight gain and 1,194 (35.26%) had gained excessive weight during pregnancy. At 21 years post-partum, 8.40% of mothers self-reported a diagnosis of diabetes made by their doctor. In the age adjusted model, we found mothers who gained excess weight during pregnancy were 1.47(1.11,1.94) times more likely to experience diabetes at 21 years post-partum compared to the mothers who gained adequate weight. This association was not explained by the potential confounders including maternal age, parity, education, race, smoking, TV watching and exercise. However, this association was mediated by the current BMI. There was no association for the women who had normal BMI before pregnancy and gained excess weight during pregnancy. The findings of this study suggest that women who gain excess weight during pregnancy are at greater risk of being diagnosed with diabetes in later life. This relationship is likely mediated through the pathway of post-partum weight-retention and obesity. This study adds evidence to the argument that excessive GWG during pregnancy for overweight mothers has long term maternal health implications.
Keyword Response rates
Risk factor
Follow up
Pregnancy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number e75679.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
School of Medicine Publications
School of Social Science Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 14 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 02 Feb 2014, 10:02:44 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service