Psychological and psychosocial functioning of children with burn scarring using cosmetic camouflage: A multi-centre prospective randomised controlled trial.

Maskell, Jessica, Newcombe, Peter, Martin, Grahan and Kimble, Roy (2014) Psychological and psychosocial functioning of children with burn scarring using cosmetic camouflage: A multi-centre prospective randomised controlled trial.. Burns, 40 1: 135-149. doi:10.1016/j.burns.2013.04.025


Author Maskell, Jessica
Newcombe, Peter
Martin, Grahan
Kimble, Roy
Title Psychological and psychosocial functioning of children with burn scarring using cosmetic camouflage: A multi-centre prospective randomised controlled trial.
Journal name Burns   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4179
1879-1409
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.burns.2013.04.025
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 40
Issue 1
Start page 135
End page 149
Total pages 15
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Abstract Background: Burns leave patients with long-term physical scarring. Children with scarring are required to face challenges of reintegration into their community, including acceptance of an altered appearance and acceptance by others. This can be difficult given society's preoccupation with physical appearance.
Formatted abstract
 Background
Burns leave patients with long-term physical scarring. Children with scarring are required to face challenges of reintegration into their community, including acceptance of an altered appearance and acceptance by others. This can be difficult given society's preoccupation with physical appearance.

Limited research exists investigating validity of cosmetic camouflage as a psychosocial intervention for children with scarring. This study investigated whether using cosmetic camouflage (Microskin™) had a positive impact on health-related quality of life, self-concept and psychopathology for children and adolescents (8–17 years) with burn scarring.

Method
A prospective multi-centre randomised controlled trial was conducted across Australian and New Zealand paediatric hospitals. 63 participants (49 females, mean age 12.7 ± 2.1 years) were enrolled. Data points were baseline (Time 1) and at 8 weeks (Time 2) using reliable and valid psychometric measures.

Results
Findings indicate there were significant improvements in socialisation, school and appearance scales on the Paediatric Quality of Life Inventory and psychopathology scores particularly peer problems decreased. However self-concept remained stable from baseline throughout intervention use.

Conclusion
Cosmetic camouflage appears to have a positive impact on quality of life particularly socialisation. Cosmetic camouflage is a valid tool to assist children with scarring to actively participate socially within their communities.
Keyword Burn scarring
Cosmetic camouflage
Quality of life
Children and adolescents
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Wed, 29 Jan 2014, 01:25:48 EST by Dr Peter Newcombe on behalf of School of Psychology