How environmental regulations affect innovation in the Australian oil and gas industry: going beyond the Porter hypothesis

Ford, Jerad A., Steen, John and Verreynne, Martie-Louise (2014) How environmental regulations affect innovation in the Australian oil and gas industry: going beyond the Porter hypothesis. Journal of Cleaner Production, 84 1: 204-213. doi:10.1016/j.jclepro.2013.12.062

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Author Ford, Jerad A.
Steen, John
Verreynne, Martie-Louise
Title How environmental regulations affect innovation in the Australian oil and gas industry: going beyond the Porter hypothesis
Journal name Journal of Cleaner Production   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0959-6526
Publication date 2014-12-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jclepro.2013.12.062
Volume 84
Issue 1
Start page 204
End page 213
Total pages 10
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract The impact of environmental regulation on innovation is of central interest to many industries and policy makers alike. While traditional research adopts a top-down view of regulation and attempts to measure the innovation response, the more bottom-up view of contemporary theory argues that firms produce innovations that exceed compliance levels as a competitive strategy. We approach this dichotomy by investigating innovation introduced by Australian oil and gas firms in light of environmental regulatory compliance burden and firm-level characteristics, including competitive capabilities. Analyses of survey responses, executive-level interviews and conference proceedings reveal both regulatory (top-down) and competitive advantage (bottom-up) perspectives explain innovation in this industry. Regression analyses reveal that product/service and novel innovations (all types) are related to a high compliance burden, competitive skills, research and development activity, and engagement in formal collaborations. Interview and conference data add nuance to our findings revealing collaborative compliance frameworks result in similar innovation outcomes.
Keyword Environmental regulation
Innovation
Oil and gas
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online ahead of print: 3 January 2014.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 28 Jan 2014, 19:13:28 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School