Tibialis anterior muscle fascicle dynamics adequately represent postural sway during standing balance

Day, James T., Lichtwark, Glen A. and Cresswell, Andrew G. (2013) Tibialis anterior muscle fascicle dynamics adequately represent postural sway during standing balance. Journal of Applied Physiology, 115 12: 1742-1750. doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00517.2013


Author Day, James T.
Lichtwark, Glen A.
Cresswell, Andrew G.
Title Tibialis anterior muscle fascicle dynamics adequately represent postural sway during standing balance
Journal name Journal of Applied Physiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 8750-7587
1522-1601
Publication date 2013-12-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1152/japplphysiol.00517.2013
Volume 115
Issue 12
Start page 1742
End page 1750
Total pages 9
Place of publication Bethesda, United States
Publisher American Physiological Society
Language eng
Abstract Tibialis anterior muscle fascicle dynamics adequately represent postural sway during standing balance. J Appl Physiol 115: 17421750, 2013. First published October 17, 2013; doi:10.1152/japplphysiol.00517.2013. To maintain a stable, upright posture, the central nervous system (CNS) must integrate sensory information from multiple sources and subsequently generate corrective torque about the ankle joint. Although proprioceptive information from the muscles that cross this joint has been shown to be vital in this process, the specific source of this information remains questionable. Recent research has been focused on the potential role of tibialis anterior (TA) muscle during standing, largely due to the lack of modulation of its activity throughout the sway cycle. Ten young, healthy subjects were asked to stand normally under varying conditions, for periods of 60 s. During these trials, intramuscular electromyographic (EMG) activity and the fascicle length of three distinct anatomical regions of TA were sampled synchronously with kinematic data regarding sway position. In the quiet standing conditions, TA muscle activity was unmodulated and fascicle length changes in each region were tightly coupled with changes in sway position. In the active sway condition, more EMG activity was observed in TA and the fascicle length changes were decoupled from sway position. No regional specific differences in correlation values were observed, contrasting previous observations. The ability of the fascicles to follow sway position builds upon the suggestion that TA is well placed to provide accurate, straightforward sensory information to the CNS. As previously suggested, through reciprocal inhibition, afferent information from TA could help to regulate plantar flexor torque at relevant phases of the sway cycle. The proprioceptive role of TA appears to become complicated during more challenging conditions.
Keyword Electromyography
Human balance
Postural sway
Proprioception
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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