Anticipatory postural activity of the deep trunk muscles differs between anatomical regions based on their mechanical advantage

Park, R. J., Tsao, H., Cresswell, A. G. and Hodges, P. W. (2014) Anticipatory postural activity of the deep trunk muscles differs between anatomical regions based on their mechanical advantage. Neuroscience, 261 161-172. doi:10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.12.037

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Author Park, R. J.
Tsao, H.
Cresswell, A. G.
Hodges, P. W.
Title Anticipatory postural activity of the deep trunk muscles differs between anatomical regions based on their mechanical advantage
Journal name Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0306-4522
1873-7544
Publication date 2014-03-07
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.neuroscience.2013.12.037
Volume 261
Start page 161
End page 172
Total pages 12
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• The nervous system differentially activates regions of trunk muscles for posture.
• Discrete activity of trunk muscles is likely to be based on mechanical advantage.
• Discrete activity implies discrete force generation without lateral transmission.

The functional differentiation between regions of psoas major (PM) and quadratus lumborum (QL) may underlie a mechanical basis for recruitment of motor units across the muscle. These mechanically unique fascicle regions of these complex multifascicular muscles, PM and QL, are likely to be controlled independently by the central nervous system (CNS). Fine-wire electrodes recorded the electromyographic activity of the PM fascicles arising from the transverse process (PM-t) and vertebral body (PM-v) and the anterior (QL-a) and posterior (QL-p) layers of QL on the right side during a postural perturbation associated with rapid arm movements. The findings of this study indicate that the CNS coordinates the activity of specific regions of PM and QL independently as a component of the anticipatory postural adjustments that precedes the predictable challenge to the spine associated with limb movements. The spatial and temporal features of discrete activity of different regions within PM and QL matched their differing mechanical advantage predicted from their anatomy. These findings suggest that the CNS differentially activates individual regions within complex spine muscles to control the three-dimensional forces applied to the spine. The data also point to a sophisticated control of muscle activation that appears based on mechanical advantage.
Keyword Lumbar spine
Trunk muscles
Fine-wire electromyography
Postural control
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 24 December 2013

 
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Created: Mon, 13 Jan 2014, 03:17:01 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences