The prevalence and risk factors of dysmenorrhea

Ju, Hong, Jones, Mark and Mishra, Gita (2014) The prevalence and risk factors of dysmenorrhea. Epidemiologic Reviews, 36 1: 104-113. doi:10.1093/epirev/mxt009

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Author Ju, Hong
Jones, Mark
Mishra, Gita
Title The prevalence and risk factors of dysmenorrhea
Journal name Epidemiologic Reviews   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0193-936X
1478-6729
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/epirev/mxt009
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 36
Issue 1
Start page 104
End page 113
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cary, NC, United States
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Dysmenorrhea is a common menstrual complaint with a major impact on women's quality of life, work productivity, and health-care utilization. A comprehensive review was performed on longitudinal or case-control or cross-sectional studies with large community-based samples to accurately determine the prevalence and/or incidence and risk factors of dysmenorrhea. Fifteen primary studies, published between 2002 and 2011, met the inclusion criteria. The prevalence of dysmenorrhea varies between 16% and 91% in women of reproductive age, with severe pain in 2%–29% of the women studied. Women's age, parity, and use of oral contraceptives were inversely associated with dysmenorrhea, and high stress increased the risk of dysmenorrhea. The effect sizes were generally modest to moderate, with odds ratios varying between 1 and 4. Family history of dysmenorrhea strongly increased its risk, with odds ratios between 3.8 and 20.7. Inconclusive evidence was found for modifiable factors such as cigarette smoking, diet, obesity, depression, and abuse. Dysmenorrhea is a significant symptom for a large proportion of women of reproductive age; however, severe pain limiting daily activities is less common. This review confirms that dysmenorrhea improves with increased age, parity, and use of oral contraceptives and is positively associated with stress and family history of dysmenorrhea.
Keyword Dysmenorrhea
Incidence
Menstrual pain
Natural history
Painful menstruation
Prevalence
Risk factors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published online: November 26, 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Public Health Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 51 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 09 Jan 2014, 19:58:50 EST by Katherine De Maria on behalf of School of Public Health