Suppressive fodder plants as part of an integrated management program for Parthenium hysterophorus L.

Khan, Naeem, Shabbir, Asad, George, Doug, Hassan, Gul and Adkins, Steve W. (2014) Suppressive fodder plants as part of an integrated management program for Parthenium hysterophorus L.. Field Crops Research, 156 172-179. doi:10.1016/j.fcr.2013.11.003


Author Khan, Naeem
Shabbir, Asad
George, Doug
Hassan, Gul
Adkins, Steve W.
Title Suppressive fodder plants as part of an integrated management program for Parthenium hysterophorus L.
Formatted title
Suppressive fodder plants as part of an integrated management program for Parthenium hysterophorus L.
Journal name Field Crops Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0378-4290
1872-6852
Publication date 2014-02-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.fcr.2013.11.003
Volume 156
Start page 172
End page 179
Total pages 8
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Abstract Parthenium hysterophorus L. is an alien invasive weed in both Australia and Pakistan infesting rangelands, reducing fodder biomass and causing significant livestock production losses. Previous studies have identified a number of introduced and native fodder species that can suppress the growth of P. hysterophorus in glasshouse trials. These species can also provide an adequate fodder biomass for livestock production. In this study 11 of these fodder species were sown at the recommended rates into P. hysterophorus infested field sites at Injune and Monto, Australia while an additional five species were sown into similar infested field sites at Islamabad and Mardan, in northern Pakistan. Measurements taken on dry shoot biomass production of the fodder species were used to determine their P. hysterophorus growth suppressing ability and fodder biomass production. In Australia, all of the fodder species suppressed the growth of P. hysterophorus, with Setaria incrassata, Cenchrus ciliaris, Clitoria ternatea, Themeda triandra and Astrebla squarrosa (Injune field site), and Chloris gayana, C. ciliaris, Dichanthium sericeum, Clitoria ternatea and Bothriochloa insculpta (Monto field site) all suppressing growth by >62% and producing at least 329gm-2 of dry fodder biomass. In Pakistan, all of the fodder species suppressed the growth of P. hysterophorus, with Sorghum almum, C. ciliaris and C. gayana suppressing growth by >73% and producing at least 622gm-2 of dry fodder biomass. Some species such as S. incrassata performed well at just one field site, while others (C. ciliaris and C. gayana) performed well at all the four field sites, indicating that such plants could be considered as part of a new integrated weed management system for P. hysterophorus in both Australia and Pakistan.
Keyword Australia
Fodder plants
Growth suppression
Integrated weed management
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 8 December 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 5 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 31 Dec 2013, 10:15:27 EST by System User on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences