Species limits, quarantine risk and the intrigue of a polyphagous invasive pest with highly restricted host relationships in its area of invasion

Rafter, Michelle A., Hereward, James P. and Walter, Gimme H. (2013) Species limits, quarantine risk and the intrigue of a polyphagous invasive pest with highly restricted host relationships in its area of invasion. Evolutionary Applications, 6 8: 1195-1207. doi:10.1111/eva.12096


Author Rafter, Michelle A.
Hereward, James P.
Walter, Gimme H.
Title Species limits, quarantine risk and the intrigue of a polyphagous invasive pest with highly restricted host relationships in its area of invasion
Journal name Evolutionary Applications   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1752-4563
1752-4571
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/eva.12096
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 6
Issue 8
Start page 1195
End page 1207
Total pages 13
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Scirtothrips aurantii is a generalist horticultural pest in its native African range and recently established quite widely in Australia on the invasive succulent weed Bryophyllum delagoense. Paradoxically, this thrips is not polyphagous in its incursive range. The issue is principally one of quarantine. Will the thrips in Australia shift, perhaps adaptively, to citrus, and should the primary focus be on containment around Australian citrus, or does the real quarantine risk exist offshore with thrips present on citrus in Africa? We examined the phylogenetic relationships between Bryophyllum-associated thrips populations in Australia and populations sampled from various host plant species in South Africa (including Bryophyllum) using both CO1 and 28s markers. Eight variable microsatellite markers were developed to assess the extent of gene flow between the thrips on different hosts in South Africa. The COI phylogeny resolved S. aurantii into three distinct clades with samples collected from B. delagoense in South Africa and Australia representing a single clade, a second clade associated with Gloriosa lilies and the third with horticultural hosts. The microsatellite analysis confirmed that the populations associated with citrus and Bryophyllum do not hybridize with one another in sympatry. We conclude that the citrus-damaging thrips are not currently present in Australia and remain a serious quarantine concern in relation to Australian horticulture. 
Keyword 28S
Bryophyllum delagoense
Citrus
COI
Cryptic species
Gene flow
Microsatellite
Quarantine
Scirtothrips aurantii
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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