Peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations in pregnant and non-pregnant greyheaded flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) and little red flying-foxes (P. scapulatus)

Towers P.A. and Martin L. (1995) Peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations in pregnant and non-pregnant greyheaded flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) and little red flying-foxes (P. scapulatus). Reproduction, Fertility and Development, 7 5: 1163-1176. doi:10.1071/RD9951163


Author Towers P.A.
Martin L.
Title Peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations in pregnant and non-pregnant greyheaded flying-foxes (Pteropus poliocephalus) and little red flying-foxes (P. scapulatus)
Journal name Reproduction, Fertility and Development   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1031-3613
Publication date 1995-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/RD9951163
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 7
Issue 5
Start page 1163
End page 1176
Total pages 14
Language eng
Subject 1103 Clinical Sciences
2743 Reproductive Medicine
1309 Developmental Biology
1310 Endocrinology
Abstract Blood was collected from breeding-season and pregnant P. poliocephalus females shot in the wild and from captive pregnant and ovariectomized P. poliocephalus and P. scapulatus females. Peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay were similar to those obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy: in intact non-pregnant P. poliocephalus females without corpora lutea (CLs) values ranged from 2 to 30 ng mL; after ovariectomy, they ranged from 1 to 85 ng mL. A significant source of progesterone in these bats may be the adrenal. In P. poliocephalus, peripheral plasma progesterone concentrations showed relatively little change over the breeding season or in early pregnancy when a CL formed, but increased from mid pregnancy to reach 200-800 ng mL in late pregnancy. A mid-pregnancy ovary with CL contained 2-80 ng progesterone whereas the contralateral ovary contained 0-13 ng. Overall, CL size decreased during pregnancy and was negatively correlated with plasma progesterone concentrations. In late pregnancy, the main source of progesterone appears to be the placenta; plasma concentrations increase with placental growth and are significantly correlated with placental weight, and placentas contain 4-8 mg progesterone g. There was no evidence that progesterone concentrations fall before parturition. Limited observations indicated that peripheral progesterone concentrations follow similar patterns in P. scapulatus.
Keyword adrenal
corpus luteum
placenta
seasonal breeding
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: ResearcherID Downloads - Archived
 
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