The immobilization of gold from Au(III) chloride by a halophilic sulphate-reducing bacterial consortium

Shuster, Jeremiah, Marsden, Sian, MacLean, Lachlan C. W, Ball, James, Bolin, Trudy and Southam, Gordon (2013) The immobilization of gold from Au(III) chloride by a halophilic sulphate-reducing bacterial consortium. Geological Society Special Publication, 393 2.1-2.15. doi:10.1144/SP393.2


Author Shuster, Jeremiah
Marsden, Sian
MacLean, Lachlan C. W
Ball, James
Bolin, Trudy
Southam, Gordon
Title The immobilization of gold from Au(III) chloride by a halophilic sulphate-reducing bacterial consortium
Journal name Geological Society Special Publication   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-8719
2041-4927
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1144/SP393.2
Volume 393
Start page 2.1
End page 2.15
Total pages 16
Place of publication Bath, Avon, United Kingdom
Publisher Geological Society Publishing House
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A consortium containing halophilic, dissimilatory sulphate-reducing bacteria was enriched from Basque Lake #1, located near Ashcroft, British Columbia, Canada to evaluate the role these bacteria have on the immobilization of soluble gold. The consortium immobilized increasing amounts of gold from gold (III) chloride solutions, under saline to hypersaline conditions, over time. Gold (III) chloride was reduced to elemental gold in all experimental systems. Salinity did not affect gold immobilization. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy demonstrated that reduced gold (III) chloride was immobilized as c. 3–10 nm gold colloids and c. 100 nm colloidal aggregates at the fluid–biofilm interface. The precipitation of gold at this organic interface protected cells within the biofilm from the ‘toxic effect’ of ionic gold. Analysis of these experimental systems using X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy confirmed that elemental gold with varying colloidal sizes formed within minutes.  The immobilization of gold by halophilic sulphate-reducing bacteria highlights a possible role for the biosphere in ‘intercepting’ mobile gold complexes within natural, hydraulic flow paths.   Based on the limited toxicity demonstrated in this experimental model, significant concentrations of elemental gold could accumulate over geological time in natural systems where soluble gold concentrations are more dilute and presumably ‘non-toxic’ to the biosphere.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Earth Sciences Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Sat, 14 Dec 2013, 00:47:07 EST by Ashleigh Paroz on behalf of School of Earth Sciences