Impact of procedural steps and cryopreservation agents in the cryopreservation of chlorophyte microalgae

Bui, Tony V. L., Ross, Ian L., Jakob, Gisela and Hankamer, Ben (2013) Impact of procedural steps and cryopreservation agents in the cryopreservation of chlorophyte microalgae. PloS One, 8 11: e78668.1-e78668.9. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0078668


Author Bui, Tony V. L.
Ross, Ian L.
Jakob, Gisela
Hankamer, Ben
Title Impact of procedural steps and cryopreservation agents in the cryopreservation of chlorophyte microalgae
Journal name PloS One   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1932-6203
Publication date 2013-11-11
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0078668
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 8
Issue 11
Start page e78668.1
End page e78668.9
Total pages 9
Editor Dee A. Carter
Place of publication San Francisco, CA, United States
Publisher Public Library of Science
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The maintenance of traditional microalgae collections based on liquid and solid media is labour intensive, costly and subject to contamination and genetic drift. Cryopreservation is therefore the method of choice for the maintenance of microalgae culture collections, but success is limited for many species. Although the mechanisms underlying cryopreservation are understood in general, many technical variations are present in the literature and the impact of these are not always elaborated. This study describes two-step cryopreservation processes in which 3 microalgae strains representing different cell sizes were subjected to various experimental approaches to cryopreservation, the aim being to investigate mechanistic factors affecting cell viability. Sucrose and dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) were used as cryoprotectants. They were found to have a synergistic effect in the recovery of cryopreserved samples of many algal strains, with 6.5% being the optimum DMSO concentration. The effect of sucrose was shown to be due to improved cell survival and recovery after thawing by comparing the effect of sucrose on cell viability before or after cryopreservation. Additional factors with a beneficial effect on recovery were the elimination of centrifugation steps (minimizing cell damage), the reduction of cell concentration (which is proposed to reduce the generation of toxic cell wall components) and the use of low light levels during the recovery phase (proposed to reduce photooxidative damage). The use of the best conditions for each of these variables yielded an improved protocol which allowed the recovery and subsequent improved culture viability of a further 16 randomly chosen microalgae strains. These isolates included species from Chlorellaceae, Palmellaceae, Tetrasporaceae, Palmellopsis, Scenedesmaceae and Chlamydomonadaceae that differed greatly in cell diameter (3–50 µm), a variable that can affect cryopreservation success. The collective improvement of each of these parameters yielded a cryopreservation protocol that can be applied to a broad range of microalgae.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 9 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 10 Dec 2013, 20:55:22 EST by Susan Allen on behalf of Institute for Molecular Bioscience