Aquaculture and sustainable development: allowing for environmental externalities and common-pool resources

Tisdell, Clem (2013). Aquaculture and sustainable development: allowing for environmental externalities and common-pool resources. In M. A. Quaddus and M. A. B. Siddique (Ed.), Handbook of Sustainable Development Planning: Studies in Modelling and Decision Support, Second Edition 2nd ed. (pp. 277-299) Cheltenham, Glos, U.K.: Edward Elgar Publishing. doi:10.4337/9780857932167

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Author Tisdell, Clem
Title of chapter Aquaculture and sustainable development: allowing for environmental externalities and common-pool resources
Title of book Handbook of Sustainable Development Planning: Studies in Modelling and Decision Support, Second Edition
Place of Publication Cheltenham, Glos, U.K.
Publisher Edward Elgar Publishing
Publication Year 2013
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
DOI 10.4337/9780857932167
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Edition 2nd
ISBN 9780857932150
9780857932167
Editor M. A. Quaddus
M. A. B. Siddique
Chapter number 12
Start page 277
End page 299
Total pages 23
Total chapters 15
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Although aquaculture has been practised for many centuries, it was in the past on quite a modest scale and limited to a few species, for example, carp. However, in recent decades, aquaculture has shown very rapid expansion. This is partly because catches of wild fish have expanded at a slower rate than demand and many new scientific and technological advances have been made in aquaculture. Furthermore, by the mid-1990s evidence available to scientists indicated that catches of wild fish had either reached, nearly reached or even exceeded their sustainable limits (Williams, 1997). Consequently, according to Meryl Williams (1997, p. 18), then Director of ICLARM, now ‘aquaculture is the major, though not sole hope, for improving the world’s fish production’. Aquaculture, particularly marine aquaculture, has become a new economic frontier. Just as humankind in the past experienced the Agricultural Revolution, it seems now to be starting on an Aqua cultural Revolution. Naturally, this raises the question of how sustainable it will be.
Q-Index Code BX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
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School of Economics Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Dec 2013, 21:36:53 EST by Emeritus Professor Clement Tisdell on behalf of School of Economics