Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions

McDowell, Michelle E., Occhipinti, Stefano and Chambers, Suzanne K. (2013) Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 46 3: 322-335. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9508-4


Author McDowell, Michelle E.
Occhipinti, Stefano
Chambers, Suzanne K.
Title Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions
Journal name Annals of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0883-6612
1532-4796
Publication date 2013-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-013-9508-4
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 46
Issue 3
Start page 322
End page 335
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Subject 3200 Psychology
2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Background: Despite uncertainty regarding the benefits of prostate cancer screening, many men have had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Purpose: This study aims to identify classes of reasons guiding men's decisions about prostate cancer screening and predict reasoning approaches by family history and prior screening behaviour. Methods: First-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer (n = 207) and men from the general population (n = 239) of Australia listed reasons they considered when deciding whether to have a PSA test. Results: Responses were coded into 31 distinct categories. Latent class analysis identified three classes. The evaluation of risk information cues class (20.9 %) contained a greater number of men with a family history (compared with control and overcome cancer/risk class; 52.7 %). Informed decisions and health system class (26.5 %) included a lower proportion of men who had had a PSA test and greater proportions of highly educated and married men. Conclusion: Understanding the reasons underlying men's screening decisions may lead to a more effective information provision and decision support.
Formatted abstract
Background: Despite uncertainty regarding the benefits of prostate cancer screening, many men have had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Purpose: This study aims to identify classes of reasons guiding men's decisions about prostate cancer screening and predict reasoning approaches by family history and prior screening behaviour.

Methods: First-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer (n = 207) and men from the general population (n = 239) of Australia listed reasons they considered when deciding whether to have a PSA test.

Results: Responses were coded into 31 distinct categories. Latent class analysis identified three classes. The evaluation of risk information cues class (20.9 %) contained a greater number of men with a family history (compared with control and overcome cancer/risk class; 52.7 %). Informed decisions and health system class (26.5 %) included a lower proportion of men who had had a PSA test and greater proportions of highly educated and married men.

Conclusion: Understanding the reasons underlying men's screening decisions may lead to a more effective information provision and decision support.
Keyword PSA test
Family history
Decision making
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 2 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 08 Dec 2013, 10:03:42 EST by System User on behalf of UQ Centre for Clinical Research