Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions

McDowell, Michelle E., Occhipinti, Stefano and Chambers, Suzanne K. (2013) Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 46 3: 322-335. doi:10.1007/s12160-013-9508-4


Author McDowell, Michelle E.
Occhipinti, Stefano
Chambers, Suzanne K.
Title Classifying the reasons men consider to be important in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) testing decisions: evaluating risks, lay beliefs, and informed decisions
Journal name Annals of Behavioral Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0883-6612
1532-4796
Publication date 2013-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s12160-013-9508-4
Volume 46
Issue 3
Start page 322
End page 335
Total pages 14
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Despite uncertainty regarding the benefits of prostate cancer screening, many men have had a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test. Purpose: This study aims to identify classes of reasons guiding men's decisions about prostate cancer screening and predict reasoning approaches by family history and prior screening behaviour.

Methods: First-degree relatives of men with prostate cancer (n = 207) and men from the general population (n = 239) of Australia listed reasons they considered when deciding whether to have a PSA test.

Results: Responses were coded into 31 distinct categories. Latent class analysis identified three classes. The evaluation of risk information cues class (20.9 %) contained a greater number of men with a family history (compared with control and overcome cancer/risk class; 52.7 %). Informed decisions and health system class (26.5 %) included a lower proportion of men who had had a PSA test and greater proportions of highly educated and married men.

Conclusion: Understanding the reasons underlying men's screening decisions may lead to a more effective information provision and decision support.
Keyword PSA test
Family history
Decision making
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: UQ Centre for Clinical Research Publications
Official 2014 Collection
 
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