Architecture as material culture: building form and materiality in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Anatolia and Levant

Love, Serena (2013) Architecture as material culture: building form and materiality in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Anatolia and Levant. Journal of Anthropological Archaeology, 32 4: 746-458. doi:10.1016/j.jaa.2013.05.002

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Author Love, Serena
Title Architecture as material culture: building form and materiality in the Pre-Pottery Neolithic of Anatolia and Levant
Journal name Journal of Anthropological Archaeology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0278-4165
1090-2686
Publication date 2013-12-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jaa.2013.05.002
Volume 32
Issue 4
Start page 746
End page 458
Total pages 13
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Highlights
• Transition from circular to rectangular buildings not corresponded with mudbricks.
• The environment is not the sole determinant for choice of building materials.
• Building materials do not dictate architectural form.
• Situates mudbrick architecture in larger scope of PPNA social practices.

Mudbrick technology and permanent architecture are Neolithic hallmarks but their origins are not well understood. By adopting a symmetrical approach to the examination of building materials, and contextualizing these materials within a cultural knowledge of resources and other concurrent social practices, this paper challenges environmentally determined approaches to explain the adoption of mudbrick technology during the PPNA in Anatolia, Upper Euphrates and the Levant. This research illustrates the weak correlation between architectural form and building material, suggesting that although nature provides resources, it is culture that dictates architectural form and material use. It is argued that the human-constructed environment became normalized throughout the PPNA and the social complexities of village life created a conceptual shift towards an artificial environment, supported by other changes in symbolic behavior. If building materials, such as mudbricks, were considered objects reflexive of human behavior, then we can access the complex and entangled relationship between people and things. Furthermore, the choice of building materials and their use in architecture can be considered codes of social practice and even ideology. As material culture, architecture becomes a metaphor for human engagement and symbolic communication.
Keyword Architecture
Neolithic
Mud brick
Anatolia
Material culture
Materiality
Çatalhöyük
Microartifacts
Levant
Catalhoyuk
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Fri, 06 Dec 2013, 20:29:15 EST by Serena Love on behalf of School of Social Science