Constructing the rural in education: the case of Outback Kids in Australia

Pini, Barbara and Mills, Martin (2013) Constructing the rural in education: the case of Outback Kids in Australia. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 36 4: 577-594. doi:10.1080/01425692.2013.829745

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Author Pini, Barbara
Mills, Martin
Title Constructing the rural in education: the case of Outback Kids in Australia
Formatted title
Constructing the rural in education: the case of Outback Kids in Australia
Journal name British Journal of Sociology of Education   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0142-5692
1465-3346
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2015
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/01425692.2013.829745
Open Access Status
Volume 36
Issue 4
Start page 577
End page 594
Total pages 18
Place of publication Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract The majority of the still limited literature on education in non-metropolitan areas adopts an understanding of rurality as a fixed and known geographic entity. This paper departs from such a functionalist perspective to explore how rurality is constructed in a programme for at-risk teenagers in remote Australia. Drawing on a range of texts about the programme, including a documentary series entitled Outback Kids, we examine how the rural space is imagined as simultaneously therapeutic and disciplining and therefore appropriate for troubled youth. Alongside this discussion we map the way in which other qualities and values associated with bifurcated definitions of the rural as a place of tradition and authenticity, and the urban as a place of disorder and pretence, are engaged in the texts to endorse the programme and its practices.
Formatted abstract
The majority of the still limited literature on education in non-metropolitan areas adopts an understanding of rurality as a fixed and known geographic entity. This paper departs from such a functionalist perspective to explore how rurality is constructed in a programme for at-risk teenagers in remote Australia. Drawing on a range of texts about the programme, including a documentary series entitled Outback Kids, we examine how the rural space is imagined as simultaneously therapeutic and disciplining and therefore appropriate for troubled youth. Alongside this discussion we map the way in which other qualities and values associated with bifurcated definitions of the rural as a place of tradition and authenticity, and the urban as a place of disorder and pretence, are engaged in the texts to endorse the programme and its practices.
Keyword Rural
Youth
At risk
Gender
Australia
Indigenous
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 29 November 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Dec 2013, 18:58:49 EST by Claire Backhouse on behalf of School of Education