Reducing alcohol-related harm experienced by Indigenous Australians: identifying opportunities for Indigenous primary health care services

Shakeshaft, Anthony, Clifford, Anton and Shakeshaft, Maree (2010) Reducing alcohol-related harm experienced by Indigenous Australians: identifying opportunities for Indigenous primary health care services. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 Supplement 1: S41-S45. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00552.x


Author Shakeshaft, Anthony
Clifford, Anton
Shakeshaft, Maree
Title Reducing alcohol-related harm experienced by Indigenous Australians: identifying opportunities for Indigenous primary health care services
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-07-08
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00552.x
Open Access Status
Volume 34
Issue Supplement 1
Start page S41
End page S45
Total pages 5
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: Identify key issues and opportunities relating to the dissemination of cost-effective interventions for alcohol in Indigenous-specific settings.

Methods: Update previous reviews of the Indigenous alcohol literature, particularly in relation to intervention and dissemination studies aimed at identifying and integrating into routine clinical care those strategies that are most cost-effective in reducing alcohol-related harm.

Results: The harmful use of alcohol has been identified as a major public health issue, which has a disproportionately high negative impact on Indigenous Australians. While the disproportionately high burden of harm borne by Indigenous Australian communities is well documented in descriptive studies, attempts to redress this imbalance through well controlled intervention and dissemination studies appear to have been inadequate to date. There is compelling evidence from the non-Indigenous community that brief intervention is an effective treatment for harmful alcohol use, compared to the relatively lower levels of evidence for primary and tertiary level interventions. The effectiveness of brief intervention for alcohol in Indigenous Australian communities should, therefore, be examined.

Conclusions and Implications: An opportunity exists to implement brief intervention into Indigenous primary health care settings, as an evidencebased strategy using established resources. There is the possibility that such Indigenous-specific health services research will lead the dissemination field in demonstrating how the implementation process can be successfully tailored to specific and defined clinical settings.
Keyword Alcohol
Brief intervention
Dissemination
Indigenous
Indigenous primary health care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Public Health Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Dec 2013, 02:46:09 EST by Anton Clifford on behalf of School of Public Health