Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: the role of child, parent, and family factors

Dittman, Cassandra K., Farruggia, Susan P., Palmer, Melanie L., Sanders, Matthew R. and Keown, Louise J. (2014) Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: the role of child, parent, and family factors. Journal of Family Psychology, 28 2: 236–243-236–243. doi:10.1037/a0035991


Author Dittman, Cassandra K.
Farruggia, Susan P.
Palmer, Melanie L.
Sanders, Matthew R.
Keown, Louise J.
Title Predicting success in an online parenting intervention: the role of child, parent, and family factors
Journal name Journal of Family Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0893-3200
1939-1293
Publication date 2014-04-01
Year available 2014
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0035991
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 28
Issue 2
Start page 236–243
End page 236–243
Total pages 8
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Language eng
Abstract The present study involved an examination of the extent to which a wide range of child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behavior and parenting outcomes after participation in an 8-session online version of the Triple P-Positive Parenting Program. Participants were mothers and fathers of 97 children aged between 3 and 8 years displaying elevated levels of disruptive behavior problems. For both mothers and fathers, poorer child behavior outcomes at postintervention were predicted by the number of sessions of the intervention completed by the family. For mothers, postintervention child behavior was also predicted by the quality of the mother-child relationship at baseline; for fathers, baseline child behavior severity was an additional predictor. Mothers' postintervention ineffective parenting was predicted by session completion and preintervention levels of ineffective parenting, whereas the only predictor of fathers' ineffective parenting at postintervention was preintervention levels of ineffective parenting. Socioeconomic risk, parental adjustment, and father participation in the intervention were not significant predictors of mother-or father-reported treatment outcomes. The implications of the findings for the provision of online parenting support are discussed.
Formatted abstract
The present study involved an examination of the extent to which child, parent, family, and program-related factors predicted child behavior and parenting outcomes following participation in an 8-session parenting program delivered online. Participants were mothers and fathers of 97 children aged between three and eight years displaying elevated levels of disruptive behavior problems. For both mothers and fathers, child behavior outcomes at post-intervention were predicted by the number of sessions of the intervention completed by the family. For mother reports, post-intervention effects on child behavior were also predicted by the quality of the mother-child relationship at baseline; for father reports, baseline child behavior severity was an additional predictor of child behavior outcomes. Program effects on mothers’ ineffective parenting at post-intervention was predicted by session completion and pre-intervention levels of ineffective parenting, while the only predictor of outcomes on fathers’ ineffective parenting at post-intervention was pre-intervention levels of ineffective parenting. Socioeconomic risk, parental adjustment, and father participation in the intervention were not significant predictors of mother- or father-reported treatment outcomes. The implications of the findings for the provision of online parenting support are discussed.
Keyword Behavior problems
Online interventions
Parent training
Predictors
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Originally presented as Paper 498 during Organized Paper Symposia 4-021 "Media- and Technology-Based Approaches to Delivering Parenting Interventions" at Society for Prevention Research 21st Annual Meeting San Francisco, CA, USA, 28-31 May, 2013. Accepted for publication November 28 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2015 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Wed, 04 Dec 2013, 00:14:45 EST by Dr Cassandra Karlie Dittman on behalf of School of Psychology