Nutritional counseling and nutritional supplements: a cornerstone of multidisciplinary cancer care for cachectic patients

Isenring, Elizabeth A. and Teleni, Laisa (2013) Nutritional counseling and nutritional supplements: a cornerstone of multidisciplinary cancer care for cachectic patients. Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care, 7 4: 390-395. doi:10.1097/SPC.0000000000000016


Author Isenring, Elizabeth A.
Teleni, Laisa
Title Nutritional counseling and nutritional supplements: a cornerstone of multidisciplinary cancer care for cachectic patients
Journal name Current Opinion in Supportive and Palliative Care   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1751-4258
1751-4266
Publication date 2013-12-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1097/SPC.0000000000000016
Volume 7
Issue 4
Start page 390
End page 395
Total pages 6
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Language eng
Subject 2730 Oncology
2700 Medicine
2706 Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine
2917 Oncology (nursing)
Formatted abstract
Purpose of review: The challenge with cancer cachexia is that it is not fully reversed by nutrition support. The purpose of this review is to provide an opinion on the nutritional management of cancer cachexia based on the most recent available evidence.
Recent findings: There continues to be a paucity of nutrition intervention studies in patients with cancer cachexia. In patients with cancer undergoing radiotherapy, there is strong evidence that nutrition counseling increases dietary intake, body weight, nutritional status and quality of life with some suggestion that dietary counseling may improve nutrition impact symptoms, treatment response and survival. In patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy, the evidence is less clear. The use of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may have some positive effects in patients with cancer; however, clinical judgment and care need to be taken in its application. Preliminary results of studies in the use of L-carnitine in improving fatigue are promising; however, the largest trial in 'healthy' cancer patients showed no benefit.
Summary: Further research into the most appropriate methods for identifying and treating cancer cachexia is required. Regardless of whether patients are experiencing reduced dietary intake resulting in malnutrition or due to cachexia, nutrition remains a cornerstone of multimodal treatment. Copyright
Keyword Cancer cachexia
Malnutrition
Nutrition
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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