Can DNA fragmentation of neat or swim-up spermatozoa be used to predict pregnancy following ICSI of fertile oocyte donors?

Gosalvez, Jaime, Caballero, Pedro, Lopez-Fernandez, Carmen, Ortega, Leonor, Guijarro, Jose Andres, Fernandez, Jose Luis, Johnston, Stephen D. and Nunez-Calonge, Rocio (2013) Can DNA fragmentation of neat or swim-up spermatozoa be used to predict pregnancy following ICSI of fertile oocyte donors?. Asian Journal of Andrology, 15 6: 812-818. doi:10.1038/aja.2013.74

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Author Gosalvez, Jaime
Caballero, Pedro
Lopez-Fernandez, Carmen
Ortega, Leonor
Guijarro, Jose Andres
Fernandez, Jose Luis
Johnston, Stephen D.
Nunez-Calonge, Rocio
Title Can DNA fragmentation of neat or swim-up spermatozoa be used to predict pregnancy following ICSI of fertile oocyte donors?
Journal name Asian Journal of Andrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1008-682X
1745-7262
Publication date 2013-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1038/aja.2013.74
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 6
Start page 812
End page 818
Total pages 7
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Nature Publishing
Language eng
Subject 2748 Urology
Abstract This study compared the potential of assessing sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) from neat semen and the subsequent swim-up (SU) procedure to predict pregnancy when conducting ICSI of fertile donor oocytes. Infertile females (n=81) were transferred embryos resulting from intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) of their partner's spermatozoa and proven donor oocytes. This model normalized the impact of female factor in putative sperm DNA repair. Semen was blindly assessed for SDF using Halosperm immediately following ejaculation (NS) and after swim-up at the time of ICSI fertilisation. There was a decrease in SDF values of the ejaculated semen sample following the swim-up protocol (P=0.000). Interestingly, pregnancy could be equally predicted from SDF values derived from either neat or swim-up semen samples. Receiver operator curves and the derived Youden's indices determined SDF cutoff values for NS and SU of 24.8% and 17.5%, respectively. Prediction of pregnancy from NS SDF had a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 69%, whereas for SU SDF was 78% and 73%, respectively. While increased levels of SDF negatively impact reproductive outcome, we have shown that a reduction in SDF following sperm selection using ICSI with proven donor oocytes is not mandatory for achieving pregnancy. This suggests that a certain level of DNA damage that is not detectable using current technologies could be impacting on the relative success of assisted reproductive technology (ART) procedures. Consequently, we propose a modification of the so called 'iceberg model' as a possible rationale for understanding the role of SDF in reproductive outcome.
Keyword Assisted reproductive technology
Egg donation
Male factor
Sperm DNA fragmentation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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