The process of developing a non-medical (advanced allied health) botulinum toxin A prescribing and injecting model of care in a public rehabilitation setting

Kuipers, Kathy, Cox, Ruth, Doherty, Doherty and Grudzinskas, Kathy (2013) The process of developing a non-medical (advanced allied health) botulinum toxin A prescribing and injecting model of care in a public rehabilitation setting. Australian Health Review, 37 5: 624-631. doi:10.1071/AH12008


Author Kuipers, Kathy
Cox, Ruth
Doherty, Doherty
Grudzinskas, Kathy
Title The process of developing a non-medical (advanced allied health) botulinum toxin A prescribing and injecting model of care in a public rehabilitation setting
Journal name Australian Health Review   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0156-5788
1449-8944
Publication date 2013-11-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1071/AH12008
Volume 37
Issue 5
Start page 624
End page 631
Total pages 8
Place of publication Collingwood, Australia
Publisher CSIRO
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective The aim of this paper was to describe the process undertaken to develop a non-medical (advanced allied health extended role) botulinum toxin A prescription and injection project for adults with upper and lower limb spasticity secondary to an acquired brain injury. The hypertonicity clinic in the present study was located in a metropolitan public hospital in Queensland where multidisciplinary services are provided by a rehabilitation specialist and an advanced occupational therapist and physiotherapist.

Methods The process of developing the model included establishing potential benefits for the role extension project and documentation of a project plan.

Results Project outcomes included the development of a relevant governance structure, a research evidence-based project evaluation framework, a draft research ethics application, delineation of the key eligibility criteria and competencies required for physiotherapist and occupational therapist prescribers, and a final project report.

Conclusion Non-medical prescribing has the potential to increase patient access to botulinum toxin A injection for the management of focal spasticity. A process that supports early patient engagement, extensive consultation with relevant stakeholders, a strong governance structure, a high-quality research project and a long lead time may maximise the potential for successful completion of advanced allied health role extension projects, including prescription and injection of botulinum toxin A.

What is known about the topic? Non-medical prescribing has been recommended as a strategy for facilitating responsive health care and addressing health workforce shortages in Australia and overseas.

What does this paper add? A detailed description of the process used to develop a non-medical prescribing and injecting project within a public hospital rehabilitation unit, as well as an analysis of the facilitators and barriers to progression.

What are the implications for practitioners? A process that supports early patient engagement, extensive consultation with relevant stakeholders, a strong governance structure, a high-quality research project and a long lead time may maximise the potential for successful completion of advanced allied health role extension projects, including prescription and injection of botulinum toxin A.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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