Towards a resistance management strategy for Helicoverpa armigera in Bt-cotton in northwestern China: an assessment of potential refuge crops

Lu, Zhao-Zhi, Zalucki, Myron P., Perkins, Lynda E., Wang, Deng-Yuan and Wu, Li-Li (2013) Towards a resistance management strategy for Helicoverpa armigera in Bt-cotton in northwestern China: an assessment of potential refuge crops. Journal of Pest Science, 86 4: 695-703. doi:10.1007/s10340-013-0517-7


Author Lu, Zhao-Zhi
Zalucki, Myron P.
Perkins, Lynda E.
Wang, Deng-Yuan
Wu, Li-Li
Title Towards a resistance management strategy for Helicoverpa armigera in Bt-cotton in northwestern China: an assessment of potential refuge crops
Formatted title
Towards a resistance management strategy for Helicoverpa armigera in Bt-cotton in northwestern China: an assessment of potential refuge crops
Journal name Journal of Pest Science   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1612-4758
1612-4766
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10340-013-0517-7
Volume 86
Issue 4
Start page 695
End page 703
Total pages 9
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Transgenic Bt-cotton now dominates the cotton-growing belt in northwestern China where there are few natural plant refuges to act as sources of moths susceptible to Bt toxin. As an initial step towards developing an insect resistance management (IRM) plan for the pest moth, Helicoverpa armigera, on Bt-cotton in this part of China, we assessed the potential of six crops grown in two configurations to act as refuge hosts for susceptible moth production in both broad-acre and small-holder farms. Egg and larval abundance indicated that H. armigera had a preference for chickpea, pigeon pea, and corn, over cotton, sorghum, and benne (sesame). There were no significant differences in egg or larval abundance between plot and strip configurations of these crop hosts. We found that sorghum was not attractive to H. armigera, contrary to the findings in other cotton production areas. Moreover, chickpea, pigeon pea, and corn were determined to be potential refuge hosts based on egg and larval abundance over the growing season. From the adult moth population dynamics in broad-acre and small-holder farms, the efficiency of alternative refuge crops, and local agricultural practices, we recommend that spring corn be grown as a strip crop as part of an IRM strategy to improve the probability of Bt-susceptible moth production and mating with resistant moths in broad-acre farms. In small-holder farms where current agricultural practices are entrenched, wheat and summer corn should be evaluated as refuge crops in the future. 
Keyword Alternative refuge
Bt-cotton
Oviposition
Population dynamics
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Grant ID 2009DFA31370
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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