Bioinformatic analyses of integral membrane transport proteins encoded within the genome of the planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica

Paparoditis, Philipp, Vastermark, Åke, Le, Andrew J., Fuerst, John A. and Saier, Milton H. (2014) Bioinformatic analyses of integral membrane transport proteins encoded within the genome of the planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica. Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes, 1838 1 PARTB: 193-215. doi:10.1016/j.bbamem.2013.08.007

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Author Paparoditis, Philipp
Vastermark, Åke
Le, Andrew J.
Fuerst, John A.
Saier, Milton H.
Title Bioinformatic analyses of integral membrane transport proteins encoded within the genome of the planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica
Formatted title
Bioinformatic analyses of integral membrane transport proteins encoded within the genome of the planctomycetes species, Rhodopirellula baltica
Journal name Biochimica et Biophysica Acta - Biomembranes   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0005-2736
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.bbamem.2013.08.007
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 1838
Issue 1 PARTB
Start page 193
End page 215
Total pages 23
Place of publication Amsterdam, Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Rhodopirellula baltica (R. baltica) is a Planctomycete, known to have intracellular membranes. Because of its unusual cell structure and ecological significance, we have conducted comprehensive analyses of its transmembrane transport proteins. The complete proteome of R. baltica was screened against the Transporter Classification Database (TCDB) to identify recognizable integral membrane transport proteins. 342 proteins were identified with a high degree of confidence, and these fell into several different classes. R. baltica encodes in its genome channels (12%), secondary carriers (33%), and primary active transport proteins (41%) in addition to classes represented in smaller numbers. Relative to most non-marine bacteria, R. baltica possesses a larger number of sodium-dependent symporters but fewer proton-dependent symporters, and it has dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) and trimethyl-amine-oxide (TMAO) reductases, consistent with its Na+-rich marine environment. R. baltica also possesses a Na+-translocating NADH:quinone dehydrogenase (Na+-NDH), a Na+ efflux decarboxylase, two Na+-exporting ABC pumps, two Na+-translocating F-type ATPases, two Na+:H+ antiporters and two K+:H+ antiporters. Flagellar motility probably depends on the sodium electrochemical gradient. Surprisingly, R. baltica also has a complete set of H+-translocating electron transport complexes similar to those present in α-proteobacteria and eukaryotic mitochondria. The transport proteins identified proved to be typical of the bacterial domain with little or no indication of the presence of eukaryotic-type transporters. However, novel functionally uncharacterized multispanning membrane proteins were identified, some of which are found only in Rhodopirellula species, but others of which are widely distributed in bacteria. The analyses lead to predictions regarding the physiology, ecology and evolution of R. baltica
Keyword Cellular energization
Electron transport
Marine ecology
Planctomycetes
Sodium motive force
Transport proteins
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online: 19 August 2013.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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