The elimination half-life of benzodiazepines and fall risk: two prospective observational studies

de Vries, Oscar J., Peeters, Geeske, Elders, Petra, Sonnenberg, Caroline, Muller, Majon, Deeg, Dorly J. H. and Lips, Paul (2013) The elimination half-life of benzodiazepines and fall risk: two prospective observational studies. Age and Ageing, 42 6: 764-770. doi:10.1093/ageing/aft089


Author de Vries, Oscar J.
Peeters, Geeske
Elders, Petra
Sonnenberg, Caroline
Muller, Majon
Deeg, Dorly J. H.
Lips, Paul
Title The elimination half-life of benzodiazepines and fall risk: two prospective observational studies
Journal name Age and Ageing   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0002-0729
1468-2834
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/ageing/aft089
Open Access Status
Volume 42
Issue 6
Start page 764
End page 770
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: the STOPP criteria advise against the use of long-acting benzodiazepines (LBs). Objective: to study whether LBs are associated with a higher fall risk than short-acting benzodiazepines (SBs) (elimination half-life ≤10 h).

Methods: we used base-line data and prospective fall follow-up from the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, a longitudinal cohort study including 1,509 community-dwelling older persons (Study 1) and from a separate fall prevention study with 564 older persons after a fall (Study 2). Time to the first fall after inclusion and number of falls in the first year after inclusion were the primary endpoints.

Results: both in Study 1 and Study 2 the use of SBs was associated with time to the first fall, hazard ratio (HR) 1.62 (95% CI: 1.03-2.56) and HR 1.64 (95% CI: 1.19-2.26),respectively. LBs were not significantly associated with time to first fall, HR 1.40 (0.85-2.31) and HR 1.08 (0.72-1.62). In both studies, the use of SBs was also associated with number of falls, odds ratio (OR) 1.28 (95% CI: 1.01-1.61) and OR 1.37 (95% CI: 1.10-1.70). LBs were not significantly associated with number of falls, OR 1.23 (0.96-1.57) and 1.10 (0.82-1.48).

Conclusions: the use of SBs is not associated with a lower fall risk compared with LBs. The use of both SBs and LBs by old persons should be strongly discouraged.
Keyword Accidental falls
Adverse drug events
Aged
Benzodiazepines
Older people
Sedatives
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
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