The development of prospective memory in young schoolchildren: The impact of ongoing task absorption, cue salience, and cue centrality

Kliegel, Matthias, Mahy, Cailin E.V., Voigt, Babett, Henry, Julie D., Rendell, Peter G. and Aberle, Ingo (2013) The development of prospective memory in young schoolchildren: The impact of ongoing task absorption, cue salience, and cue centrality. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 116 4: 792-810. doi:10.1016/j.jecp.2013.07.012


Author Kliegel, Matthias
Mahy, Cailin E.V.
Voigt, Babett
Henry, Julie D.
Rendell, Peter G.
Aberle, Ingo
Title The development of prospective memory in young schoolchildren: The impact of ongoing task absorption, cue salience, and cue centrality
Journal name Journal of Experimental Child Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-0965
1096-0457
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jecp.2013.07.012
Open Access Status
Volume 116
Issue 4
Start page 792
End page 810
Total pages 19
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
3205 Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
Abstract This study presents evidence that 9- and 10-year-old children outperform 6- and 7-year-old children on a measure of event-based prospective memory and that retrieval-based factors systematically influence performance and age differences. All experiments revealed significant age effects in prospective memory even after controlling for ongoing task performance. In addition, the provision of a less absorbing ongoing task (Experiment 1), higher cue salience (Experiment 2), and cues appearing in the center of attention (Experiment 3) were each associated with better performance. Of particular developmental importance was an age by cue centrality (in or outside of the center of attention) interaction that emerged in Experiment 3. Thus, age effects were restricted to prospective memory cues appearing outside of the center of attention, suggesting that the development of prospective memory across early school years may be modulated by whether a cue requires overt monitoring beyond the immediate attentional context. Because whether a cue is in or outside of the center of attention might determine the amount of executive control needed in a prospective memory task, findings suggest that developing executive control resources may drive prospective memory development across primary school age.
Keyword Cue centrality
Cue salience
Development
Ongoing task
Prospective memory
Schoolchildren
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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