A qualitative investigation into third-party functioning and third-party disability in aphasia: Positive and negative experiences of family members of people with aphasia

Grawburg, Meghann, Howe, Tami, Worrall, Linda and Scarinci, Nerina (2013) A qualitative investigation into third-party functioning and third-party disability in aphasia: Positive and negative experiences of family members of people with aphasia. Aphasiology, 27 7: 828-848. doi:10.1080/02687038.2013.768330


Author Grawburg, Meghann
Howe, Tami
Worrall, Linda
Scarinci, Nerina
Title A qualitative investigation into third-party functioning and third-party disability in aphasia: Positive and negative experiences of family members of people with aphasia
Journal name Aphasiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-7038
1464-5041
Publication date 2013-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2013.768330
Volume 27
Issue 7
Start page 828
End page 848
Total pages 21
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Subject 3204 Developmental and Educational Psychology
3310 Linguistics and Language
1203 Design Practice and Management
2733 Otorhinolaryngology
2912 LPN and LVN
2808 Neurology
2728 Clinical Neurology
Abstract Background: In the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), the World Health Organization introduces the term "third-party disability" and identifies the need for further investigation into family members' Functioning and Disability in relation to a significant other's health condition. Aims: This qualitative investigation represents the first phase of a mixed methods study to develop a tool for measuring third-party functioning and third-party disability in aphasia. The aims of this phase of the study were to explore: (1) the positive aphasia-related changes associated with third-party functioning, and; (2) the negative aphasia-related changes associated with third-party disability, as experienced by family members of adults with aphasia post-stroke. Methods & Procedures: This study used an inductive design with a qualitative descriptive research strategy to explore the lived experience of having a relative with aphasia. Twenty family members (e.g., spouses, parents, children, siblings, etc.) of individuals with aphasia participated in individual in-depth semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using qualitative content analysis. Outcomes & Results: Analysis revealed five categories of positive aphasia-related changes associated with third-party functioning: (1) emotions; (2) communication; (3) relationships; (4) recreational activities and social life; and (5) paid/volunteer work or education. In addition, seven categories of negative aphasia-related changes associated with third-party disability were revealed: (1) physical, mental, and emotional health; (2) communication; (3) relationships; (4) recreational activities and social life; (5) paid/volunteer work or education; (6) domestic and caregiving responsibilities; and (7) finances. Conclusions: Interpreted within the framework of the ICF, this study showed how the pervasive effects of aphasia are associated with changes in Functioning and Disability in family members, providing a holistic description of family members' experience using the standardised language of the ICF. Clinically, these results emphasise the importance of recognising the positive and negative outcomes for close family members in the development of a rehabilitation plan for the family to address their experience of third-party disability.
Keyword Aphasia
Family members
ICF
Qualitative interviews
Stroke
Third-party disability
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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