Recursion patterns and their impact on programming language design

Bailes, Paul (2013). Recursion patterns and their impact on programming language design. In: W. Assawinchaichote, K. Piromsopa and P.Bhattarakosol, Proceedings of the 8th IASTED International Conference on Advances in Computer Science, ACS 2013. 8th IASTED International Conference on Advances in Computer Science, ACS 2013, Phuket, Thailand, (450-459). 10 -12 April 2013. doi:10.2316/P.2013.801-023


Author Bailes, Paul
Title of paper Recursion patterns and their impact on programming language design
Conference name 8th IASTED International Conference on Advances in Computer Science, ACS 2013
Conference location Phuket, Thailand
Conference dates 10 -12 April 2013
Proceedings title Proceedings of the 8th IASTED International Conference on Advances in Computer Science, ACS 2013
Journal name Proceedings of the 8th IASTED International Conference on Advances in Computer Science, ACS 2013
Place of Publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Publication Year 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.2316/P.2013.801-023
ISBN 9780889869462
Editor W. Assawinchaichote
K. Piromsopa
P.Bhattarakosol
Start page 450
End page 459
Total pages 10
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Applicative/functional programming is considerably simplified through the use of specific recursion patterns as opposed to general recursion. The viability of catamorphic recursion patterns as a pragmatic and theoretical basis makes it feasible to consider a programming language based on them. Syntactic considerations focus on notation to clarify the structures involved in the use of catamorphisms in this critical role. More fundamental semantic considerations involve the recognition that a catamorphic programming style essentially involves the treatment of data exclusively as functions and the extension of this approach to the derivation of other types of data whose behaviours are not generally catamorphic. Implementation by preprocessing into Haskell can be structured to avoid the limitations of Haskell’s types, but a general regime of dynamic types seems unavoidable as an alternative. Clear connections with other work on subrecursive programming illuminates other paths for further development.
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Keyword Catamorphism
Foldr
Functional programming
Recursion pattern
Q-Index Code EX
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

 
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