Acclimation of leaves to low light produces large grana: the origin of the predominant attractive force at work

Jia, Husen, Liggins, John R. and Chow, Wah Soon (2012) Acclimation of leaves to low light produces large grana: the origin of the predominant attractive force at work. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences, 367 1608: 3494-3502. doi:10.1098/rstb.2012.0071


Author Jia, Husen
Liggins, John R.
Chow, Wah Soon
Title Acclimation of leaves to low light produces large grana: the origin of the predominant attractive force at work
Journal name Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0962-8436
1471-2970
Publication date 2012-12-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1098/rstb.2012.0071
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 367
Issue 1608
Start page 3494
End page 3502
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher The Royal Society Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Photosynthetic membrane sacs (thylakoids) of plants form granal stacks interconnected by nonstacked thylakoids, thereby being able to fine-tune (i) photosynthesis, (ii) photoprotection and (iii) acclimation to the environment. Growth in low light leads to the formation of large grana, which sometimes contain as many as 160 thylakoids. The net surface charge of thylakoid membranes is negative, even in low-light-grown plants; so an attractive force is required to overcome the electrostatic repulsion. The theoretical van derWaals attraction is, however, at least 20-fold too small to play the role. We determined the enthalpy change, in the spontaneous stacking of previously unstacked thylakoids in the dark on addition of Mg2+, to be zero or marginally positive (endothermic). The Gibbs free-energy change for the spontaneous process is necessarily negative, a requirement that can be met only by an increase in entropy for an endothermic process.We conclude that the dominant attractive force in thylakoid stacking is entropy-driven. Several mechanisms for increasing entropy upon stacking of thylakoid membranes in the dark, particularly in low-light plants, are discussed. In the light, which drives the chloroplast far away from equilibrium, granal stacking accelerates non-cyclic photophosphorylation, possibly enhancing the rate at which entropy is produced.
Keyword Depletion attraction
Electrostatic repulsion
Entropy
Grana
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: Institute for Molecular Bioscience - Publications
 
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