Undue influence of weight and shape: Is it distinct from body dissatisfaction and concern about weight and shape?

Wade, T. D., Zhu, G. and Martin, N. G. (2011) Undue influence of weight and shape: Is it distinct from body dissatisfaction and concern about weight and shape?. Psychological Medicine, 41 4: 819-828. doi:10.1017/S0033291710001066


Author Wade, T. D.
Zhu, G.
Martin, N. G.
Title Undue influence of weight and shape: Is it distinct from body dissatisfaction and concern about weight and shape?
Journal name Psychological Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0033-2917
1469-8978
Publication date 2011-01-01
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0033291710001066
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 41
Issue 4
Start page 819
End page 828
Total pages 10
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
3202 Applied Psychology
Abstract Background Three cognitive constructs are risk factors for eating disorders: undue influence of weight and shape, concern about weight and shape, and body dissatisfaction (BD). Undue influence, a diagnostic criterion for eating disorders, is postulated to be closely associated with self-esteem whereas BD is postulated to be closely associated with body mass index (BMI). We understand less about the relationships with concern about weight and shape. The aim of the current investigation was examine the degree of overlap across these five phenotypes in terms of latent genetic and environmental risk factors in order to draw some conclusions about the similarities and differences across the three cognitive variables.Method A sample of female Australian twins (n=1056, including 348 complete pairs), mean age 35 years (s.d.=2.11, range 28-40), completed a semi-structured interview about eating pathology and self-report questionnaires. An independent pathways model was used to investigate the overlap of genetic and environmental risk factors for the five phenotypes.Results In terms of variance that was not shared with other phenotypes, self-esteem emerged as being separate, with 100% of its variance unshared with the other phenotypes, followed by undue influence (51%) and then concern (34%), BD (28%) and BMI (32%).Conclusions In terms of shared genetic risk, undue influence and concern were more closely related than BD, whereas BMI and BD were found to share common sources of risk. With respect to environmental risk factors, concern, BMI and BD were more closely related to each other than to undue influence.
Keyword Body dissatisfaction
heritability
undue influence of weight and shape
weight and shape concern
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Grant ID 160009
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 16 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Thu, 28 Nov 2013, 07:11:02 EST by System User on behalf of Scholarly Communication and Digitisation Service