Giant, Krüppel, and caudal act as gap genes with extensive roles in patterning the honeybee embryo

Wilson, Megan J., Havler, Melanie and Dearden, Peter K. (2010) Giant, Krüppel, and caudal act as gap genes with extensive roles in patterning the honeybee embryo. Developmental Biology, 339 1: 200-211. doi:10.1016/j.ydbio.2009.12.015


Author Wilson, Megan J.
Havler, Melanie
Dearden, Peter K.
Title Giant, Krüppel, and caudal act as gap genes with extensive roles in patterning the honeybee embryo
Formatted title
Giant, Krüppel, and caudal act as gap genes with extensive roles in patterning the honeybee embryo
Journal name Developmental Biology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0012-1606
1095-564X
Publication date 2010-03-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.ydbio.2009.12.015
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 339
Issue 1
Start page 200
End page 211
Total pages 12
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher Academic Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
In Drosophila, gap genes translate positional information from gradients of maternal coordinate activity and act to position the periodic patterns of pair-rule gene stripes across broad domains of the embryo. In holometabolous insects, maternal coordinate genes are fast-evolving, the domains that gap genes specify often differ from their orthologues in Drosophila while the expression of pair-rule genes is more conserved. This implies that gap genes may buffer the fast-evolving maternal coordinate genes to give a more conserved pair-rule output. To test this idea, we have examined the function and expression of three honeybee orthologues of gap genes, Krüppel, caudal, and giant. In honeybees, where many Drosophila maternal coordinate genes are missing, these three gap genes have more extensive domains of expression and activity than in other insects. Unusually, honeybee caudal mRNA is initially localized to the anterior of the oocyte and embryo, yet it has no discernible function in that domain. We have also examined the influence of these three genes on the expression of honeybee even-skipped and a honeybee orthologue of engrailed and show that the way that these genes influence segmental patterning differs from Drosophila. We conclude that while the fundamental function of these gap genes is conserved in the honeybee, shifts in their expression and function have occurred, perhaps due to the apparently different maternal patterning systems in this insect.
Keyword Evolution
Segmentation
Gap genes
Axis formation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
 
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