Use of administrative data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders

Kisely, Stephen, Lin, Elizabeth, Gilbert, Charles, Smith, Mark, Campbell, Leslie-Anne and Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria (2009) Use of administrative data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 43 12: 1118-1125. doi:10.3109/00048670903279838


Author Kisely, Stephen
Lin, Elizabeth
Gilbert, Charles
Smith, Mark
Campbell, Leslie-Anne
Vasiliadis, Helen-Maria
Title Use of administrative data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-8674
1440-1614
Publication date 2009-01-01
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/00048670903279838
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 43
Issue 12
Start page 1118
End page 1125
Total pages 8
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Sage Publications Ltd
Language eng
Subject 2738 Psychiatry and Mental health
Abstract Objective: There is increasing interest in the use of administrative data for surveillance and research in Australia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of such data for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorder using databases from the following Canadian provinces: British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and Nova Scotia. Method: A population-based record-linkage analysis was done using data from physician billings and hospital discharge abstracts, and community-based clinics using a case definition of ICD-9 diagnoses of 296.0-296.9, 311.0, and 300.0-300.9. Results: The prevalence of treated mood and/or anxiety disorder was similar in Nova Scotia, British Columbia, and Ontario at approximately 10%. The prevalence for Quebec was slightly lower at 8%. Findings from the provinces showed consistency across age and sex despite variations in data coding. Women tended to show a higher prevalence overall of mood and anxiety disorder than men. There was considerably more variation, however, when treated anxiety (300.0-300.9) and mood disorders (296.0296.9, 311.0) were considered separately. Prevalence increased steadily to middle age, declining in the 50s and 60s, and then increased after 70 years of age. Conclusions: Administrative data can provide a useful, reliable and economical source of information for the surveillance of treated mood and/or anxiety disorder. Due to the lack of specificity, however, in the diagnoses and data capture, it may be difficult to conduct surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders as separate entities. These findings may have implications for the surveillance of mood and anxiety disorders in Australia with the development of a national network for the extraction, linkage and analysis of administrative data.
Keyword Administrative data
Anxiety
Depression
Mood disorder
Surveillance
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 16 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 17 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 27 Nov 2013, 18:57:17 EST by System User on behalf of School of Medicine