Growth rates of juvenile green turtles Chelonia mydas from three ecologically distinct foraging habitats along the east central coast of Florida, USA

Kubis, Stacy, Chaloupka, Milani, Ehrhart, Llewellyn and Bresette, Michael (2009) Growth rates of juvenile green turtles Chelonia mydas from three ecologically distinct foraging habitats along the east central coast of Florida, USA. Marine Ecology Progress Series, 389 257-269. doi:10.3354/meps08206


Author Kubis, Stacy
Chaloupka, Milani
Ehrhart, Llewellyn
Bresette, Michael
Title Growth rates of juvenile green turtles Chelonia mydas from three ecologically distinct foraging habitats along the east central coast of Florida, USA
Formatted title
Growth rates of juvenile green turtles Chelonia mydas from three ecologically distinct foraging habitats along the east central coast of Florida, USA
Journal name Marine Ecology Progress Series   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0171-8630
1616-1599
Publication date 2009-09-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3354/meps08206
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 389
Start page 257
End page 269
Total pages 13
Place of publication Oldendorf, Germany
Publisher Inter-Research
Language eng
Formatted abstract
A generalized additive mixed modeling approach was used to assess somatic growth for juvenile green turtles Chelonia mydas at 4 sites in 3 ecologically distinct foraging habitats along the east central coast of Florida, USA. The 3 habitats were a man-made nuclear submarine turning basin (Trident Submarine Basin), an estuary (Indian River Lagoon), and oceanic sabellariid worm rock reefs (Sebastian Inlet and St. Lucie Power Plant). Turtles from the Indian River Lagoon site grew significantly faster than turtles from the Trident Submarine Basin and sabellariid worm rock reef sites. There were no significant differences in growth rates between the sabellariid worm rock reef and Trident Submarine Basin sites. Non-monotonic or dome-shaped growth rate functions reflecting an immature peak in growth rates were observed for all 3 habitats. Growth rates peaked in 1998 for turtles in the Trident Submarine Basin and sabellariid worm rock reef habitats; since then growth rates have declined. This temporal decline in growth rates may reflect density-dependent effects on growth as more juveniles recruit to Florida for aging grounds, a direct result of increases in nest production at the primary rookeries (Costa Rica, Florida and Mexico). Developmental habitats are important for the survival of juvenile marine turtles. This study illustrates the degree to which juvenile growth rates vary among developmental habitats, which ultimately can affect the rate of growth and recovery potential of nesting stocks.
Keyword Chelonia mydas
Density-dependent effects
Developmental habitat
Florida
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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