Longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical students: an innovation adopted by medical schools in Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the United States

Norris, Thomas E., Schaad, Douglas C., DeWitt, Dawn, Ogur, Barbara, Hunt, D. Daniel, Consortium of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships and Eley, Diann (2009) Longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical students: an innovation adopted by medical schools in Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the United States. Academic Medicine, 84 7: 902-907. doi:10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181a85776


Author Norris, Thomas E.
Schaad, Douglas C.
DeWitt, Dawn
Ogur, Barbara
Hunt, D. Daniel
Consortium of Longitudinal Integrated Clerkships
Eley, Diann
Title Longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical students: an innovation adopted by medical schools in Australia, Canada, South Africa, and the United States
Journal name Academic Medicine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1040-2446
1938-808X
Publication date 2009-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1097/ACM.0b013e3181a85776
Volume 84
Issue 7
Start page 902
End page 907
Total pages 6
Place of publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher Lippincott Williams & Wilkins
Subject 2700 Medicine
3304 Education
Formatted abstract
Purpose: Integrated clinical clerkships represent a relatively new and innovative approach to medical education that uses continuity as an organizing principle, thus increasing patient-centeredness and learner-centeredness. Medical schools are offering longitudinal integrated clinical clerkships in increasing numbers. This report collates the experiences of medical schools that use longitudinal integrated clerkships for medical student education in order to establish a clearer characterization of these experiences and summarize outcome data, when possible.

Method: The authors sent an e-mail survey with open text responses to 17 medical schools with known longitudinal integrated clerkships.

Results: Sixteen schools in four countries on three continents responded to the survey. Fifteen institutions have active longitudinal integrated clerkships in place. Two programs began before 1995, but the others are newer. More than 2,700 students completed longitudinal integrated clerkships in these schools. The median clerkship length is 40 weeks, and in 15 of the schools, the core clinical content was in medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and obstetrics-gynecology. Eleven schools reported supportive student responses to the programs. No differences were noted in nationally normed exam scores between program participants and those in the traditional clerkships. Limited outcomes data suggest that students who participate in these programs are more likely to enter primary care careers.

Conclusions: This study documents the increasing use of longitudinal integrated clerkships and provides initial insights for institutions that may wish to develop similar clinical programs. Further study will be needed to assess the long-term impact of these programs on medical education and workforce initiatives.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Scopus Citation Count Cited 110 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Wed, 27 Nov 2013, 16:01:05 EST by System User on behalf of School of Medicine