Steatosis as a cofactor in other liver diseases: hepatitis C virus, alcohol, hemochromatosis, and others

Clouston, Andrew D., Jonsson, Julie R. and Powell, Elizabeth E. (2007) Steatosis as a cofactor in other liver diseases: hepatitis C virus, alcohol, hemochromatosis, and others. Clinics in Liver Disease, 11 1: 173-189. doi:10.1016/j.cld.2007.02.007


Author Clouston, Andrew D.
Jonsson, Julie R.
Powell, Elizabeth E.
Title Steatosis as a cofactor in other liver diseases: hepatitis C virus, alcohol, hemochromatosis, and others
Journal name Clinics in Liver Disease   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1089-3261
1557-8224
Publication date 2007-02-01
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.cld.2007.02.007
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 11
Issue 1
Start page 173
End page 189
Total pages 17
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Language eng
Abstract As obesity prevalence rises, there is evidence that fatty liver disease can act synergistically with other chronic liver diseases to aggravate parenchymal injury. This is characterized best in chronic hepatitis C, where steatosis is caused by viral and metabolic effects. There is evidence that steatosis and its metabolic abnormalities also exacerbate other diseases, such as alcoholic liver disease, hemochromatosis, and, possibly, drug-induced liver disease. The pathogenesis seems related to increased susceptibility of steatotic hepatocytes to apoptosis, enhanced oxidative injury, and altered hepatocytic regeneration. Data suggest that active management of obesity may improve liver injury and decrease the progression of fibrosis in patients who have other chronic liver diseases.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
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