Are we chained to our desks? Describing desk-based sitting using a novel measure of occupational sitting

Ryde, Gemma Cathrine, Brown, Helen Elizabeth, Gilson, Nicholas David and Brown, Wendy (2014) Are we chained to our desks? Describing desk-based sitting using a novel measure of occupational sitting. Journal of Physical Activity and Health, 11 7: 1318-1323. doi:10.1123/jpah.2012-0480

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Ryde, Gemma Cathrine
Brown, Helen Elizabeth
Gilson, Nicholas David
Brown, Wendy
Title Are we chained to our desks? Describing desk-based sitting using a novel measure of occupational sitting
Journal name Journal of Physical Activity and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1543-3080
1543-5474
Publication date 2014-09-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1123/jpah.2012-0480
Open Access Status Not Open Access
Volume 11
Issue 7
Start page 1318
End page 1323
Total pages 6
Place of publication Champaign, IL, United States
Publisher Human Kinetics
Language eng
Abstract Background: Prolonged occupational sitting is related to poor health outcomes. Detailed data on sitting time at desks are required to understand and effectively influence occupational sitting habits. Methods: Full-time office employees were recruited (n = 105; mean age 40.9 +/- 11.5 years; BMI 26.1 +/- 3.9, 65% women). Sitting at the desk and in other work contexts was measured using a sitting pad and ActivPAL for an entire working week. Employees used a diary to record work hours. Time spent at work, sitting at work and at the desk; number of sit to stand transitions at the desk; and number of bouts of continuous sitting at the desk <20 and > 60 minutes, were calculated. Results: Average time spent at work was 8.7 +/- 0.8 hours/day with 67% spent sitting at the desk (5.8 +/- 1.2 hours/day), and 4% in other workplace settings. On average, employees got up from their desks 3 times/hour (29 +/- 13/day). Sitting for more than 60 consecutive minutes occurred infrequently (0.69 +/- 0.62 times/day), with most sit to stands (80%; 23 +/- 14) occurring before 20 minutes of continual sitting. Conclusion: The findings provide highly detailed insights into desk-based sitting habits, highlighting large proportions of time spent sitting at desks, but with frequent interruptions.
Formatted abstract
Background: Prolonged occupational sitting is related to poor health outcomes. Detailed data on sitting time at desks are required to understand and effectively influence occupational sitting habits.

Methods: Full time office employees were recruited (n=105; mean age 40.9±11.5 years; BMI 26.1±3.9, 65% women). Sitting at the desk and in other work contexts was measured using a sitting pad and ActivPAL for an entire working week. Employees used a diary to record work hours. Time spent at work, sitting at work and at the desk; number of sit to stand transitions at the desk; and number of bouts of continuous sitting at the desk <20 and >60 minutes, were calculated.

Results: Average time spent at work was 8.7±0.8 hours/day with 67% spent sitting at the desk (5.8±1.2 hours/day), and 4% in other workplace settings. On average, employees got up from their desks three times/hour (29±13/day). Sitting for more than 60 consecutive minutes occurred infrequently (0.69±0.62 times/day), with most sit to stands (80%; 23±14) occurring before 20 minutes of continual sitting occured.

Conclusion: The findings provide highly detailed insights into desk-based sitting habits, highlighting large proportions of time spent sitting at desks, but with frequent interruptions.
Keyword Sitting patterns
Sedentary behaviour
Workplace
Measurement
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 6 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Mon, 25 Nov 2013, 02:52:29 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences