Quantitative determination of metal and metalloid spatial distribution in hydrated and fresh roots of cowpea using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy

Wang, Peng, Menzies, Neal W., Lombi, Enzo, McKenna, Brigid A., de Jonge, Martin D., Donner, Erica, Blamey, F. Pax C., Ryan, Chris G., Paterson, David J., Howard, Daryl L., James, Simon A. and Kopittke, Peter M. (2013) Quantitative determination of metal and metalloid spatial distribution in hydrated and fresh roots of cowpea using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Science of the Total Environment, 463 131-139. doi:10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.091


Author Wang, Peng
Menzies, Neal W.
Lombi, Enzo
McKenna, Brigid A.
de Jonge, Martin D.
Donner, Erica
Blamey, F. Pax C.
Ryan, Chris G.
Paterson, David J.
Howard, Daryl L.
James, Simon A.
Kopittke, Peter M.
Title Quantitative determination of metal and metalloid spatial distribution in hydrated and fresh roots of cowpea using synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy
Journal name Science of the Total Environment   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0048-9697
1879-1026
Publication date 2013-10-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2013.05.091
Volume 463
Start page 131
End page 139
Total pages 9
Place of publication Amsterdam, The Netherlands
Publisher Elsevier BV
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Many metals and metalloids, jointly termed metal(loid)s, are toxic to plants even at low levels. This has limited the study of their uptake, distribution, and modes of action in plant roots grown at physiologically relevant concentrations. Synchrotron-based X-ray fluorescence microscopy was used to examine metal(loid)s in hydrated cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L.) roots exposed to Zn(II), Ni(II), Mn(II), Cu(II), Hg(II), Se(IV), Se(VI), As(III), or As(V). Development of a mathematical model enabled in situ quantitative determination of their distribution in root tissues. The binding strength of metals influenced the extent of their movement through the root cylinder, which influenced the toxic effects exerted-metals (e.g. Cu, Hg) that bind more strongly to hard ligands had high concentrations in the rhizodermis and caused this tissue to rupture, while other metals (e.g. Ni, Zn) moved further into the root cylinder and did not cause ruptures. When longitudinal distributions were examined, the highest Se concentration in roots exposed to Se(VI) was in the more proximal root tissues, suggesting that Se(VI) is readily loaded into the stele. This contrasted with other metal(loid)s (e.g. Mn, As), which accumulated in the apex. These differences in metal(loid) spatial distribution provide valuable quantitative data on metal(loid) physiology, including uptake, transport, and toxicity in plant roots.
Keyword Distribution
Hydrated root
Metal(loid)s
Toxicity
Uptake
X ray fluorescence microscopy
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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