Dysgraphia in dementia: a systematic investigation of graphemic buffer features in a case series

Haslam, Catherine, Kay, Janice, Tree, Jeremy and Baron, Rachel (2009) Dysgraphia in dementia: a systematic investigation of graphemic buffer features in a case series. Neurocase, 15 4: 338-351. doi:10.1080/13554790902842011


Author Haslam, Catherine
Kay, Janice
Tree, Jeremy
Baron, Rachel
Title Dysgraphia in dementia: a systematic investigation of graphemic buffer features in a case series
Journal name Neurocase   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1355-4794
1465-3656
Publication date 2009-06-30
Year available 2009
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13554790902842011
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 338
End page 351
Total pages 14
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract In this paper we report findings from a systematic investigation of spelling performance in three patients - PR, RH and AC - who despite their different medical diagnoses showed a very consistent pattern of dysgraphia, more typical of graphemic buffer disorder. Systematic investigation of the features characteristic of this disorder in Study 1 confirmed the presence of length effects in spelling, classic errors (i.e., letter substitution, omission, addition, transposition), a bow-shaped curve in the serial position of errors and consistency in substitution of consonants and vowels. However, in addition to this clear pattern of graphemic buffer impairment, evidence of regularity effects and phonologically plausible errors in spelling raised questions about the integrity of the lexical spelling route in each case. A second study was conducted, using a word and non-word immediate delay copy task, in an attempt to minimise the influence of orthographic representations on written output. Persistence of graphemic buffer errors would suggest an additional, independent source of damage. Two patients, PR and AC, took part and in both cases symptoms of graphemic buffer disorder persisted. Together, these findings suggest that damage to the graphemic buffer may be more common than currently suggested in the literature.
Keyword Case series
Dementia
Dysgraphia
Graphemic buffer
Spelling
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 20:15:53 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology