Errorless learning and spaced retrieval: How do these methods fare in healthy and clinical populations?

Haslam, Catherine, Hodder, Kathryn I. and Yates, Philip J. (2011) Errorless learning and spaced retrieval: How do these methods fare in healthy and clinical populations?. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 33 4: 432-447. doi:10.1080/13803395.2010.533155


Author Haslam, Catherine
Hodder, Kathryn I.
Yates, Philip J.
Title Errorless learning and spaced retrieval: How do these methods fare in healthy and clinical populations?
Journal name Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0168-8634
Publication date 2011-01-10
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13803395.2010.533155
Open Access Status Not yet assessed
Volume 33
Issue 4
Start page 432
End page 447
Total pages 16
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract While errorless learning and spaced retrieval have both proved effective in helping many patients with acquired brain injury (ABI) and dementia learn novel information, it is not clear which of these principles we should apply to target treatment most effectively. To address this issue we conducted a systematic comparison of these principles in three experiments, comparing their effectiveness in healthy controls (N = 60), patients with ABI (N = 30), and patients with dementia (N = 15). Participants were asked to learn face-name associations, and the relative effectiveness of the principles over and above trial-and-error learning was investigated. The results were remarkably consistent across experiments: Both errorless learning and spaced retrieval produced greater accuracy in name recall than did trial-and-error learning, but recall under conditions of spaced retrieval was significantly better than that under errorless learning. We discuss the implications of these findings and suggest that spaced retrieval may be the stronger memory rehabilitation principle when it comes to learning face-name associations in people with mild to moderate memory impairment.
Keyword Acquired brain injury
Dementia
Errorless learning
Memory rehabilitation
Spaced retrieval
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 19:47:27 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology