Water clubs in residential care: is it the water or the club that enhances health and well-being?

Gleibs, Ilka H., Haslam, Catherine, Haslam, S. Alexander and Jones, Janelle M. (2011) Water clubs in residential care: is it the water or the club that enhances health and well-being?. Psychology and Health, 26 10: 1361-1377. doi:10.1080/08870446.2010.529140


Author Gleibs, Ilka H.
Haslam, Catherine
Haslam, S. Alexander
Jones, Janelle M.
Title Water clubs in residential care: is it the water or the club that enhances health and well-being?
Journal name Psychology and Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0887-0446
1476-8321
Publication date 2011-05-19
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/08870446.2010.529140
Volume 26
Issue 10
Start page 1361
End page 1377
Total pages 17
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Abstract Recent research suggests that establishing water clubs in care homes can counteract the dangers of dehydration and enhance residents’ health and well-being. This study provided an experimental test of this idea, and also explored the possibility that it is the social interaction that clubs provide which delivers health-related benefits. Consistent with this hypothesis, the study found no evidence that, on its own, increased focus on water consumption enhanced residents’ health or well-being. However, residents who took part in water clubs showed improved levels of perceived social support, and those who participated in water and control clubs showed beneficial outcomes in terms of the number of General Practitioner calls they required. Consistent with a social identity approach to health and well-being, a mediation analysis also indicated that clubs achieve these positive outcomes by providing social support that helps to build a shared sense of social identity among residents.
Keyword Social identity
Well-being
Residential care
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 19:44:06 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology