Mental health support groups, stigma, and self-esteem: positive and negative implications of group identification

Crabtree, Jason W., Haslam, S. Alexander, Postmes, Tom and Haslam, Catherine (2010) Mental health support groups, stigma, and self-esteem: positive and negative implications of group identification. Journal of Social Issues, 66 3: 553-569. doi:10.1111/j.1540-4560.2010.01662.x


Author Crabtree, Jason W.
Haslam, S. Alexander
Postmes, Tom
Haslam, Catherine
Title Mental health support groups, stigma, and self-esteem: positive and negative implications of group identification
Journal name Journal of Social Issues   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0022-4537
1540-4560
Publication date 2010-09-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1540-4560.2010.01662.x
Volume 66
Issue 3
Start page 553
End page 569
Total pages 17
Place of publication Hoboken, NJ, United States
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Research into the relationship between stigmatization and well-being suggests that identification with a stigmatized group can buffer individuals from the adverse effects of stigma. In part, this is because social identification is hypothesized to provide a basis for social support which increases resistance to stigma and rejection of negative in-group stereotypes. The present research tests this model among individuals with mental health problems. As hypothesized, group identification predicted increased social support, stereotype rejection, and stigma resistance. These self-protective mechanisms were in turn found to predict higher levels of self-esteem. However, the general effect of these associations was to suppress a negative relationship between social identification and self-esteem. This confirms that the positive impact of identification lies in its capacity to provide access to stress-buffering mechanisms but also indicates that the impact of identification with a severely stigmatized group is not necessarily positive. Implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 19:24:42 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology