In home or at home? How collective decision making in a new care facility enhances social interaction and wellbeing amongst older adults

Knight, Craig, Haslam, S. Alexander and Haslam, Catherine (2010) In home or at home? How collective decision making in a new care facility enhances social interaction and wellbeing amongst older adults. Ageing and Society, 30 8: 1393-1418. doi:10.1017/S0144686X10000656


Author Knight, Craig
Haslam, S. Alexander
Haslam, Catherine
Title In home or at home? How collective decision making in a new care facility enhances social interaction and wellbeing amongst older adults
Journal name Ageing and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0144-686X
1469-1779
Publication date 2010-09-29
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1017/S0144686X10000656
Volume 30
Issue 8
Start page 1393
End page 1418
Total pages 26
Place of publication Cambridge, United Kingdom
Publisher Cambridge University Press
Language eng
Abstract Benevolent, long-term care can threaten older adults' sense of autonomy in a residential home environment. Increasing reliance on a hotel style of living has been seen to erode social identity, life satisfaction and even survival or lifespan. Drawing on evidence from both gerontological and social psychological literature, this paper examines the links between the empowerment of residents and their subsequent quality of life in the context of a move into a new care facility in a medium-sized town in South-West England. A longitudinal experiment was conducted during which 27 residents on one floor of a new facility were involved in decisions surrounding its décor, while those on another floor were not. The residents' attitudes and behaviour were monitored at three points over five months (four weeks pre-move, four weeks post-move, and four months post-move). Consistent with the social identity literature, members of the empowered group reported increased identification with staff and fellow residents in the new home, displayed enhanced citizenship, reported improved wellbeing, and made more use of the communal space. Moreover the staff found the empowered residents to be more engaged with their environment and the people around them, to be generally happier and to have better health. These patterns were observed one month after the move and remained four months later. Some implications for theory and practice are discussed.
Keyword Care home
Empowerment
Social identity
Space
Wellbeing
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 15 Nov 2013, 19:21:40 EST by Catherine Haslam on behalf of School of Psychology