Engaging Australian small-scale lifestyle landowners in natural resource management programmes – Perceptions, past experiences and policy implications

Meadows, John, Emtage, Nick and Herbohn, John (2014) Engaging Australian small-scale lifestyle landowners in natural resource management programmes – Perceptions, past experiences and policy implications. Land Use Policy, 36 618-627. doi:10.1016/j.landusepol.2013.10.016


Author Meadows, John
Emtage, Nick
Herbohn, John
Title Engaging Australian small-scale lifestyle landowners in natural resource management programmes – Perceptions, past experiences and policy implications
Journal name Land Use Policy   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0264-8377
1873-5754
Publication date 2014-01-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.landusepol.2013.10.016
Volume 36
Start page 618
End page 627
Total pages 10
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Language eng
Abstract This study explores Australian small-scale rural lifestyle landowners’ perceptions of and experiences with natural resource management (NRM) extension and incentive programmes and discusses means to better-match such programmes to these landowners’ NRM interests, assistance needs and delivery preferences. Data was collected from seventeen in-depth qualitative case-studies of small-acreage landholders located in the Noosa hinterland in south-east Queensland. These landholders indicated a high need for expert advice, labour and other resource assistance to achieve their property management objectives. They had, however, a low-level of awareness and understanding of available programmes (particularly incentive schemes) that could provide some of their needed support. Other key barriers to the landholders’ participation in these programmes were aversions to support providers, a perceived unsuitability of properties or irrelevance of particular incentive programmes, and concerns about programme application procedures or property-rights and value-related implications of engagement. Increased NRM engagement among small-scale lifestyle landowners may be achievable through amendments to existing support programmes and better communication of these programmes. The design and delivery of appropriate measures and messages may require collaborative partnerships, with knowledgeable and influential ‘go-to’ landowners and peer-mentoring networks playing a critical role. In many cases, conservation-focused incentive programmes may need to facilitate cooperative NRM among groups of adjoining micro-scale lifestyle landowners and allow greater flexibility in the length and allowable land and forest management practices of contractual agreements. Moreover, small-scale lifestyle landowners have much interest in and need for support to integrate multi-purpose agroforestry systems with other environmental and aesthetic property management goals. Workshops, follow-up field-days on participating properties, free one-on-one on-property advice, and NRM guides that include detailed case-study accounts of landowner experiences are important means of communicating the availability, administrative requirements and benefits of support programmes to small-scale lifestyle landowners.
Keyword Amenity landscapes
Incentive programmes
Forest management
Multi-purpose agroforestry
Qualitative research
Small-acreage landowners
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Agriculture and Food Sciences
Official 2014 Collection
 
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Created: Thu, 14 Nov 2013, 22:22:04 EST by Mary-Anne Marrington on behalf of School of Agriculture and Food Sciences