Detection of deception based on fMRI activation patterns underlying the production of a deceptive response and receiving feedback about the success of the deception after a mock murder crime

Cui, Qian, Vanman, Eric J., Wei, Dongtao, Yang, Wenjing, Jia, Lei and Zhang, Qinglin (2013) Detection of deception based on fMRI activation patterns underlying the production of a deceptive response and receiving feedback about the success of the deception after a mock murder crime. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, Advance Access 1-9. doi:10.1093/scan/nst134

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Author Cui, Qian
Vanman, Eric J.
Wei, Dongtao
Yang, Wenjing
Jia, Lei
Zhang, Qinglin
Title Detection of deception based on fMRI activation patterns underlying the production of a deceptive response and receiving feedback about the success of the deception after a mock murder crime
Journal name Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1749-5024
Publication date 2013-08-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1093/scan/nst134
Open Access Status DOI
Volume Advance Access
Start page 1
End page 9
Total pages 9
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Oxford University Press
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The ability of a deceiver to track a victim’s ongoing judgments about the truthfulness of the deceit can be critical for successful deception. However, no study has yet investigated the neural circuits underlying receiving a judgment about one’s lie. To explore this issue, we used a modified Guilty Knowledge Test in a mock murder situation to simultaneously record the neural responses involved in producing deception and later when judgments of that deception were made. Producing deception recruited the bilateral inferior parietal lobules (IPLs), right ventral lateral prefrontal (VLPF) areas and right striatum, among which the activation of the right VLPF contributed mostly to diagnosing the identities of the participants, correctly diagnosing 81.25% of ‘murderers’ and 81.25% of ‘innocents’. Moreover, the participant’s response when their deception was successful uniquely recruited the right middle frontal gyrus, bilateral IPLs, bilateral orbitofrontal cortices, bilateral middle temporal gyrus and left cerebellum, among which the right IPL contributed mostly to diagnosing participants’ identities, correctly diagnosing 93.75% of murderers and 87.5% of innocents. This study shows that neural activity associated with being a successful liar (or not) is a feasible indicator for detecting lies and may be more valid than neural activity associated with producing deception.
Keyword Deception
Judgment
Lie detection
Functional magnetic resonance imaging
fMRI
Social neuroscience
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published online: August 14, 2013

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 7 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 8 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Thu, 14 Nov 2013, 17:50:13 EST by Dr Eric Vanman on behalf of School of Psychology