Reflection on the benefits and limitations of participant-generated photography as an adjunct to qualitative interviews with participants with aphasia

Brown, Kyla, Worrall, Linda, Davidson, Bronwyn and Howe, Tami (2013) Reflection on the benefits and limitations of participant-generated photography as an adjunct to qualitative interviews with participants with aphasia. Aphasiology, 27 10: 1214-1231. doi:10.1080/02687038.2013.808736


Author Brown, Kyla
Worrall, Linda
Davidson, Bronwyn
Howe, Tami
Title Reflection on the benefits and limitations of participant-generated photography as an adjunct to qualitative interviews with participants with aphasia
Journal name Aphasiology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0268-7038
1464-5041
Publication date 2013-10-01
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/02687038.2013.808736
Volume 27
Issue 10
Start page 1214
End page 1231
Total pages 18
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: Visual methods, including participant-generated photography as a stimulus to qualitative interviews, have a long history in the social science research as a means of enriching qualitative research data. However, little is known about their use with people with a communication disability such as aphasia. In this article, we provide a commentary on the benefits and limitations of participant-generated photography as an adjunct to qualitative interviews for individuals with aphasia. We base our reflections on experiences using this method in a study exploring the meaning of living successfully with aphasia from the perspectives of 25 participants with chronic aphasia.

Reflections: Benefits of the method include facilitation of rapport and animated discussion that provided a greater voice of authority and a sense of research ownership for participants. An additional benefit we identify is the use of photographs as communication aids during interviews. Limitations we discuss are: participants' spouses taking photographs for them, participants' physical difficulties using cameras, and ethical issues of photograph use in research.

Conclusions:
Based on our findings, we support the use of the participant-generated photography and advocate for researchers to consider diverse methods to capture the voices of individuals with communication disabilities.
Keyword Aphasia
Qualitative
Photovoice
Photography
Visual methods
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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